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Peace Studies at Manchester University | Plowshares | Indianapolis Peace Institute | Journal of Religion, Conflict, and Peace
  Volume 34   November 2007 

 

Introduction


WHAT'S IN A NAME?
by Tim McElwee

TRIBUTES TO KEN AND VIONA BROWN


Articles


THE MOVEMENT AGAINST WAR IN IRAQ
by David Cortright

Cortright reviews the extent and nature of the Iraq antiwar movement, describing the mammoth scale of global protest prior to the invasion and the continuing and growing political opposition to the war in the years since. He highlights a few specific dimensions of the antiwar upsurge, particularly the rise of Internet organizing, and offers some observations about the overall impacts of the movement.


NONVIOLENT RESISTANCE, NOT VIOLENT REPRESSION, IS THE TRUE STORY FROM BURMA
by Cynthia Boaz

In contrast to the junta’s claims of “normalcy” and “restored stability,” sources inside Burma have been telling some extraordinary stories of ongoing resistance over the past several weeks. These forms of resistance represent several categories of nonviolent tactics, and they serve as further support for the thesis that the uprising in Burma is more than a spontaneous series of protests by a few disgruntled students and monks.


WHAT WORKS? EVIDENCE FROM RESEARCH ON NONVIOLENT SOCIAL MOVEMENTS
by Abigail A. Fuller

While much as been written on the philosophy and practice of nonviolence, there has been little systematic analysis of the effectiveness of different types of nonviolent action for social movements. Fuller presents a summary of the available scholarly evidence of what works – the conditions under which various nonviolent strategies and tactics are most effective.


THE REBELLION OF THE FORAJIDOS: THE MOVEMENT TO OVERTHROW LUCIO GUTIERREZ
by Benjamin Leiter

Leiter provides a detailed account of the little-known 2005 popular movement that caused Ecuadorian President, Lucio Gutiérrez, to flee the country. Leiter pays special attention to the role radio played, the lack of central leadership, the spontaneity of organizing, and the nonviolent tactics used in the movement. Finally, he discusses the extent to which the model of the Forajido Rebellion is replicable.


CHANGE IS IN THE DAILY THINGS
by Erin Kindy

In Colombia, the work for nonviolent social change has become a daily task. Kindy shares glimpses of the quotidian work for peace in the midst of a 50 year civil war.


Since 1984, Dr. Neil Wollman has undertaken the long struggle for moral criteria to be applied to TIAA-CREF investment policies. The TIAA-CREF campaign has confronted the greatest obstacles but has reaped significant success. TIAA-CREF has added a Social Choice fund as well as significant community and micro-finance investments, thanks to Neil.


INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE FOR THE ABOLITION OF FOREIGN MILITARY BASES
by Benjamin Leiter

In 2007 a newly formed global antibase network convened in Ecuador to hold their inaugural conference.  In addition to a report on the 2007 No Bases conference, Leiter provides brief accounts of antimilitary base struggles being waged in Hawaii, Guam, Okinawa, Diego Garcia, and Europe.


A GATE-CRASHER’S CHANGE OF HEART
by Allison Klein

The guests were enjoying French wine and cheese on a Capitol Hill patio. When a gunman burst in, the would-be robbery took an unusual turn.

 

From the Institute


NEWS FROM THE PEACE STUDIES INSTITUTE

ALUMNI AND FRIENDS UPDATES

2006-2007 PEACE STUDIES ACTIVITIES AND PHOTOS


Purpose Statement

Nonviolent Social Change is dedicated to publishing accounts of nonviolent conflict that have not been given sufficient attention. Published since 1971 as the Bulletin of the Peace Studies Institute, Nonviolent Social Change is an annual publication of the Manchester University Peace Studies Institute, North Manchester, Indiana.

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