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Peace Studies at Manchester University | Plowshares | Indianapolis Peace Institute | Journal of Religion, Conflict, and Peace
  Volume 39  

2012 

Videos from Peace Studies

Gene Sharp: Innovator of the Year Award

Gene Sharp: Manchester University 2011 Innovator of the Year from Peace Studies Institute on Vimeo.

Gene Sharp, author of non-violent revolution worldwide – including the strategies that toppled the Egyptian government – is Manchester University’s 2011 Innovator of the Year.


Nominated in 2012 and 2009 for the Nobel Peace Prize, Gene Sharp is author of the groundbreaking book, From Dictatorship to Democracy, which lists 198 nonviolent weapons for toppling dictators. The guide, available free online, has been slipped across borders and hidden from police all over the world.

Sharp’s methods have influenced and inspired democratic struggles in the Balkans, Eastern Europe, Indonesia and Burma. In 2009, the Iranian government charged protesters with using Gene Sharp’s tactics. His core message: The power of dictatorships stems from the willing obedience of the people they govern. If the people withhold their consent, a regime will crumble.


“Gene Sharp’s tactics for peaceful removal of powerful dictators and how he made his work available to the Arab Spring citizen revolutionaries is truly innovative,” said Jim Falkiner, the Mark E. Johnston Professor of Entrepreneurship. “Gene Sharp created and shares for free his proven tools that inspire people to stand up to oppression and win the battle peacefully.”

Manchester blended presentation of the award and Sharp’s acceptance speech into an multi-media convocation at 3:30 p.m. on Tuesday, April 10. (The 84-year-old was unable to make the trip in person.) Peace Studies student, Jonathan Ulrich, had the opportunity to go with Professor Falkiner and Vice-President Dave McFadden to interview Sharp and to present him with the award.


Sharp held a research appointment to Harvard University’s Center for International Affairs for more than 30 years. With graduate degrees from Ohio State and Oxford universities, he is professor emeritus of political science for the University of Massachusetts. For more about Gene Sharp, visit www.aeinstein.org.


 

Rachel Gross: A Life Story Interview

Rachel Gross: A Life Story Interview from Peace Studies Institute on Vimeo.

In this first interview session, Rachel Gross tells part of her life story. She discusses her formative experiences growing up, at home, in her church and at college. Stories of her development into a peacemaker accompany personal challenges and stories of personal growth. She also discusses the role of community in her life and what it means to be a peacemaker.

Rachel Gross coordinates the Death Row Support Project, an organization which facilitates letter writing to prisoners on death row.

Make sure to check out session 2 for the rest of the interview including discussion of the Death Row Support Project.

My thanks go to all those who made this interview possible including Katy Gray Brown, Katherine Tinsley, Judd Case and Daniel Allan at Manchester College. My most special thanks go of course to Rachel Gross for granting this interview and offering the hospitality of her home and food to me.

June 2, 2012
Jonathan Ulrich

Rachel Gross: A Life Story Interview, Session 2

Rachel Gross: A Life Story Interview, Session 2 from Peace Studies Institute on Vimeo.

In this the second interview session of a life story interview with Rachel Gross. In it Rachel tells part of her life story. She builds on the first session to tell about her faith, her involvement in the church, the Death Row Support Project (DRSP) and more. If you are interested in the DRSP, the discussion beginning around 51 may be especially interesting. Rachel tells about how the DRSP fits into the larger movement against the death penalty and uses her gifts, what a typical day at the DRSP looks like, what makes the work exciting, what is most challenging as well as what the future of the DRSP may hold.

Check out session 1 where Rachel discusses her formative experiences growing up, at home, in her church and at college. Stories of her development into a peacemaker accompany personal challenges and stories of personal growth. She also discusses the role of community in her life and what it means to be a peacemaker.

Rachel Gross coordinates the Death Row Support Project, an organization which facilitates letter writing to prisoners on death row.

My thanks go to all those who made this interview possible including Katy Gray Brown, Katherine Tinsley, Judd Case and Daniel Allan at Manchester University. My most special thanks go of course to Rachel Gross for granting this interview and offering the hospitality of her home and food to me.

June 2, 2012
Jonathan Ulrich

 

 

 

   

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