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Peace Studies at Manchester University | Plowshares | Indianapolis Peace Institute | Journal of Religion, Conflict, and Peace
  Volume 36   October 2009 

 

Introduction


VARIETIES OF NONVIOLENCE
by Abigail A. Fuller

 

Dedication


TO PHIL AND LOUIE BALDWIN RIEMAN
by Ken Brown

 

Articles


NONVIOLENT EVOLUTION: VENEZUELA'S OPPOSITION TO HUGO CHAVEZ
by Benjamin Leiter

 

In 2002 leaders of the opposition camp carried out an abortive coup against President Hugo Chávez and later staged an oil strike that crippled the economy but failed to topple the president. Five years later a more moderate student movement based on nonviolent principles emerged against the closing of an opposition TV station and a polemic constitutional referendum. The students succeeded in challenging Chávez with means that were not only morally sound but also strategically smart. They illustrated the effectiveness of nonviolence in polarized societies by achieving what the traditional opposition could not five years earlier. 


WHAT'S FOR DINNER: LOCAL FOOD AND THE PATH TO AN ETHICAL AND MEANINGFUL LIFE
by Colleen Hamilton

 

This work responds to the question of how to live a more ethical and meaningful life.  It develops the idea of a local food economy as a means for humans to coexist with their natural environment while finding purpose in community.  Two texts inform this work: How Are We to Live by Peter Singer and The Great Turning by Daniel Korten.  Both redefine community as interdependent communal groups working cooperatively.  Food cultivation, preparation, and consumption within such a community both increases the likelihood of ethical behavior and provides meaningful work based on community connections.  Contrary to the agribusiness model of current food production, steps toward environmental and relational harmony include eating seasonally, becoming informed, and buying from a farmers’ market or joining community-supported agriculture.  The analysis explores these developments in the move toward local living economies, a step in the right direction for humankind and the earth.


 

The Green Revolution ushered in half a century of systemic exploitation that resulted in appalling environmental and human cost. This system, upon which we rely for only everything, is eroding. The Agricultural industry in the United States must open itself to radical reform soon. Provided is a brief outline of reforms that must be included in the impending Agricultural Revolution and the history and ideology at its foundation.


ACTING UNDER THE INFLUENCE: THE EFFECTS OF ELITE POLITICAL SUPPORT ON ANTI-NUCLEAR SOCIAL MOVEMENT ORGANIZATIONS
by Mary Cox

 

This research addresses the dynamics of the World Friendship Center and the Hiroshima Peace Culture Foundation, two anti-nuclear weapons social movement organizations. It investigates how these dynamics are affected by the level of support from political elites. The collected data are analyzed using an interpretive, qualitative approach. Data were drawn from internet sources about The World Friendship Center and the Hiroshima Peace Culture Foundation, personal interviews with the leaders of these organizations, and the researcher’s personal experience in Japan as a student of peace. The research found that the level of elite support determined the political opportunities available to both social movement organizations, thus shaping the nature of the organizations’ goals, tactics, and strategies.  In turn, this affected the outcomes of the social movement organizations, as evidenced by the ability of the organizations to reach a global audience and affect political change.  The analysis concludes that the presence or lack of elite political support for a social movement organization helps to determine the social movement organization’s goals, tactics, strategies, and outcomes.


BREAKING THE CYCLE: TEACHING KIDS THE SKILLS THEY NEED TO STAY OUT OF PRISON
by Nicolas Kauffman

 

Over the summer of 2008 Nick received the Scout Fuller Summer Service Award to work with an organization called Aftercare for Indiana through Mentoring (AIM). AIM is a program for juvenile offenders that uses mentoring and life skills classes to give them the resources they need to make it in the real world so they don't have to go back to jail.


MINNESOTA PEACE TEAM: PARTISANS FOR NONVIOLENCE
by Phil Stolzfus

 

September, 2008 represented a remarkable moment in the history of peace team work in North America. For the first time, the model of nonpartisan international peace teams, as understood and developed by Nonviolent Peaceforce in Sri Lanka and the Philippines, was put to the test on the domestic front by Minnesota Peace Team, a start-up organization of citizens concerned about the potential for violence at Republican National Convention protests. This paper investigates the utility of the concept of “nonpartisanship” as a marker for self-understanding in domestic peace team work.


BARACK OBAMA'S ELECTION OF 2008: DEMOCRATIC NONVIOLENCE AND THE POWER OF RULING ELITES
by Richard Johnson


Barack Obama’s election advances one essential form of nonviolence, democratic nonviolence, but simultaneously he strongly supports capitalism and the state in which ruling elites commonly seek to maintain their power by circumventing the power of the people.

It appears to me that Obama’s election reversed the increase of the power of ruling elites in many ways because of an upsurge of progressive forces across the nation, but to what extent the power of ruling elites will be held in check by his election remains to be seen. It is possible that these elites will be able to maintain or even strengthen their power during an Obama administration; it is also possible that the power of progressive movements may be able to alter how ruling elites operate. Since I favor the expansion of democracy, I will explore how the power of the people can prevail in the struggle for power that will take place in this new administration. It will take a monumental effort on the part of progressives in the U.S. and other countries to reduce the power of ruling elites of this imperial nation.


GANDHI TRANSFORMATION SERIES: REFLECTIONS ON THE LIFE AND WORK OF GANDHI THROUGH PAINTING
by Kate Brelje

 

The Gandhi Transformation Series is a collection of works by Kate Brelje created in the spring of 2007 in response to the content of Professor Tim McElwee and Prof. Richard Johnson’s course on Gandhi. The original objective of the project was to use visual representation through weekly posters that incorporated the class readings and discussion in a brief presentation at the beginning of each class. By the end of the semester, the posters painted in acrylic on poster board numbered ten and revealed a coherent chronological organization.


 

From the Institute


NEWS FROM THE PEACE STUDIES INSTITUTE

ALUMNI AND FRIENDS UPDATES

2008-2009 PEACE STUDIES ACTIVITIES AND PHOTOS


 

Purpose Statement

Nonviolent Social Change is dedicated to publishing accounts of nonviolent conflict that have not been given sufficient attention. Published since 1971 as the Bulletin of the Peace Studies Institute, Nonviolent Social Change is an annual publication of the Manchester University Peace Studies Institute, North Manchester, Indiana.

 

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