2009 JANUARY SESSION and SPRING SEMESTER

REGISTRATION INFORMATION

NOVEMBER 3-7, 2008

 

Continuing students should submit completed Course Request forms to the Office of the Registrar according to the following schedule.  Students who have already enrolled for the 2009 January Session and spring semesters may make changes to their schedules any time during registration. New students register by appointment with the Registrar.

 

The Schedule of Classes will be updated daily to show closed and cancelled classes. Click here to view the 2009 January Session or 2009 Spring Semester Schedule of Classes.

  

REGISTRATION IN THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR

Students may register in the Office of the Registrar during or after - but not prior to - the appointed times listed below. 

 

        Date/time                                             Current class standing (based on number of hours earned)

        November 3       8:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.       Seniors, Juniors

        November 4       8:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.       Sophomores

        November 5-7    8:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.       First-Year Students

        November 7       8:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.       Postgraduate, high school, special students. LAST DAY TO ENROLL WITHOUT PENALTY

 

ONLINE REGISTRATION

Students may register online through Gateway during the times listed below. Advisors must approve students for online registration. Follow these instructions.

     

        Date/time                                              Current class standing (based on number of hours earned)

        November 3     Beginning at 12:01 a.m      Seniors, Juniors

        November 4     Beginning at 12:01 a.m.     Sophomores

        November 5     Beginning at 12:01 a.m.     First-Year Students

        November 7   Online registration ends at 5 p.m.

 

A $40 fee will be assessed to students who enroll after registration ends. Generally, students are not allowed to register after the first day of classes are scheduled to meet, or after Change of Course Days.

 

Students not planning to enroll for January Session and spring semester must complete the formal withdrawal procedures through the Office of Counseling Services.

   

Information about off-campus courses and courses at other colleges is listed below.

       

Descriptions for temporary courses not included in the Manchester University Catalog are listed below.

                            

HIST T20 THE SAMURAI

This course traces the rise and fall of Japan's warrior class, examining both historical developments and the depiction of the samurai in Japanese and western popular culture.  Course materials include historical texts, literature, and films. Prerequisite: HIST 100, HIST 101, or permission of instructor. GE-M2

 

HIST T24 HISTORY OF THE PALESTINIAN-ISRAELI CONFLICT

The goal of this course is to provide background and to sketch the complexities of the divisions in Israel and Palestine. Specifically, this class is designed to acquaint students with the principal events, major figures, and different perspectives on the conflict.  In studying these concepts we will take a cursory look at the origins of Islam and Judaism, the political background of the Middle East, and some of the diplomatic agreements that have tried to solve the enmity.  We also examine the situation from looking at a variety of the attitudes of everyday people on all sides.  Through looking at documents, oral histories, film, and we will gain a better understanding of the importance and the difficulties of the Middle East. GE-M2.

 

IDIV 420 CC: CINEMA FOR SOCIAL CHANGE

This course explores cinema as a vehicle for social change and conflict.  In the class, students acquire a vocabulary for cinematic analysis; screen representative movies in film history; and use film as a window to broader ideological, ethical, peace-and-justice issues.  While diverse in theme, origin, and technique, the film screenings share one mark: they embody revolutions in either form or content. This is a film studies course, not a filmmaking course.  Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing. GE-L

 

IDIV 420 CC: DEVELOPMENT OF MODERN SCIENTIFIC THOUGHT IN GREAT BRITAIN

This course examines the contributions of British scientists to the development of modern scientific theory.  By visiting museums and historical sites in Great Britain, the lives and works of many scientists will be explored.   The influences of the environment in which these scientists lived will be examined from the perspective of history, politics, social structure, and religion.  The period of scientific achievement and discovery to be examined begins in the 17th century and the effects on culture and society then, and now, will be addressed.  Prerequisite: Junior or senior class standing. GE-L.

 

IDIV 420 CC: GLOBALIZATION

A study of the causes and consequences of globalization and its processes, including the technological, political, economic, and cultural dimensions that link individuals, governments, and firms across national borders. The effects of globalization on war, peace, and economic justice are examined in detail. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing. GE-L.

 

IDIV T11 CAREER CHOICES & COMPETENCIES

This course is designed to introduce students to the concepts of decision making, self-assessment, career exploration and career planning. Helpful for students who are undeclared majors, those changing majors and those exploring career applications of their majors.

 

MATH T31 HISTORY OF MATHEMATICS 

An overview of aspects of the history of mathematics from ancient times through the development of abstraction in the nineteenth century.  The course will consider both the growth of mathematical ideas and the context in which these ideas developed in various civilizations.  Attention will be paid to how the history of mathematical ideas is important in the teaching of these ideas in both secondary school and college. Prerequisites: MATH 121, 130.

 

PEAC T31 GANDHI

A comprehensive review of the life and thought of Mohandas Gandhi, the person considered by many as the foremost theorist regarding the efficacy of nonviolent social change.  The course focuses on Gandhi’s major writings pertaining to the theory and practice of nonviolence, as well as an assessment of Gandhi’s impact on the world. GE-M2.

 

 

JANUARY 2009 OFF-CAMPUS COURSES

Off-campus courses are marked as OC on the Schedule of Classes.  Contact the instructor for details about individual travel courses.                                                              

 

COMM 325 Intercultural Theatre

Travel to China to study and experience the culture an the traditional performing art of Chinese Opera.  You will visit such sights as the great wall, the Forbidden City, Tiananmen Square, the Terra-Cotta Warriors, and more.  You will have personalized instruction in elements of Chinese Opera. Cities on the itinerary include Beijing, Xian, Suchow, and Shanghai. GE-M2

INSTRUCTOR: Scott Strode

LOCATION: China

    

HIST 320 Comparative Civilization

Study through travel the history and cultures of Germany and Central Europe.   Explore some of the most interesting and important sites of European history, with special concentration on the medieval, Baroque, and modern periods (especially World War II and the Cold War).  3 Credits.

INSTRUCTOR: Mark Angelos

LOCATION: Germany (Berlin, Dresden, Munich w/Dachau, Heidelberg), Austria (Vienna, Salzburg), Czech Republic (Prague), and Hungary (Budapest).

 

HUM 130 Experiencing the Arts

Experience the Arts in Rome, Florence, Venice and other Italian cities, while studying painting, sculpture, architecture and music within their historical periods.  This course combines on-campus information with an off-campus study tour.  Open to all levels, including first-year students. GE-I1

INSTRUCTOR: Thelma Rohrer

LOCATION: Italy

 

IDIV 420 CC: Development of Scientific Thought in Great Britain

This course examines the contributions of British scientists to the development of modern scientific theory. By visiting museums and historical sites in Great Britain, the lives and works of many scientists will be explored.  The influences of the environment in which these scientists lived will be examined from the perspective of history, politics, social structure, and religion. The period of scientific achievement and discovery begins in the 17th century, and effects on culture and society - then and now - will be addressed.  GE-L

INSTRUCTOR: Susan Klein

LOCATION: Great Britain

 

NASC 310 Medical Practicum

The Medical Practicum provides an opportunity for students to experience a health care in a developing country by living and working with physicians and dentists to provide operate a clinic in rural Nicaragua. 3 Credits, P/NP only and open to any major. 

INSTRUCTOR: Jeff Osborne

LOCATION: Nicaragua

 

POSC 274 Topics in American Politics

During this course, we'll travel to Washington, DC, to observe and discuss the political transitions surrounding the inauguration of the 44th President and the start of the 111th Congress. We'll focus on the personnel, problems, and policies that will shape politics in the coming year. Activities planned for the course include:

    - Sightseeing:  Visit the Smithsonian Institution, the White House, the Capitol, Arlington National Cemetery, the National Press Club, and other major sights.

    - Politics: Meet with government officials, policy experts, and journalists.

    - Unique events:  Attend inauguration events. See the Supreme Court in session.

    - Fun: Attend a stage production at Ford's Theatre of the Kennedy Center. Enjoy political satire in song from The Capitol Steps.

INSTRUCTOR: Leonard Williams

LOCATION: Washington, DC

 

PSYC 350 Multicultural Psychology  

GE-M1

INSTRUCTOR: Gary Zimmerman

LOCATION: Hawaii

 

SOWK 350 Policy and Practice Issues in Social Welfare

INSTRUCTOR: Brad Yoder

LOCATION: Jamaica

 

 

 ADDITIONAL JANUARY SESSION OPPORTUNITIES

 Many colleges across the country offer a January Session similar to Manchester’s. Students who would like to experience life on another campus may elect to attend another college during January Session.  Colleges attended in previous January Sessions or who have invited Manchester University students to attend include:

 

Austin College (Texas)

Bethel College (Kansas)

Birmingham-Southern College (Alabama)

Gustavus Adolphus College (Minnesota)

Huntington University (Indiana)

McPherson College (Kansas)

Saint Olaf College (Minnesota)

University of La Verne (California)

 

Contact the Registrar for more information.