2011 SUMMER and FALL SEMESTER

and

2012 JANUARY SESSION and SPRING SEMESTER

REGISTRATION INFORMATION

APRIL 12-29, 2011

 

Continuing students may register online or submit completed Course Request forms to the Office of the Registrar according to the following schedule. New students will register during New Student Orientation the summer or by individual appointments with the Registrar.

 

Click here to view the 2011 Summer, 2011 Fall Semester, 2012 January Session or 2012 Spring Semester Schedule of Classes. The schedule can also be viewed using Search for Sections on WebAdvisor

  

ONLINE REGISTRATION

Students may register online through Gateway during the times listed below. Advisors must approve students for online registration.

Date/time                                      Current class standing (based on number of hours completed)

April 12            Beginning at noon    Graduate Students

April 15            Beginning at noon    Seniors, Juniors
April 18            Beginning at noon    Sophomores
April 20            Beginning at noon    First-Year Students

April 29           Online registration ends at 5 p.m.

REGISTRATION IN THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR

Students may register in the Office of the Registrar during or after - but not prior to - the appointed times listed below. 

Date/time                                           Current class standing (based on number of hours completed)

April 15            8:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.       Graduate Students
April 19            8:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.       Seniors, Juniors
April 21            8:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.       Sophomores

April 25            8:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.       First-Year Students: S-Z

April 26            8:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.       First-Year Students: A-L

April 27            8:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.       First-Year Students: M-R

April 28-29       8:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.       Postgraduate, guest & special students

                                                         

A $40 late registration fee will be assessed to students who enroll after May 19. Students who enroll after August 15 will be assessed a $120 late registration fee. Generally, students are not allowed to register after the first day of classes are scheduled to meet, or after Change of Course Days.

 

Students not planning to enroll for the fall semester must complete the formal withdrawal procedures through the Office of Counseling Services.

   

Information about 2012 January Session off-campus courses and courses at other colleges is listed below.

Descriptions for new and temporary courses are listed below. See the MC Catalog for other course descriptions
BUS 445 MARKETING MANAGEMENT               3 SH
Students examine all elements of the marketing mix and develop a marketing plan for a product or service. Topics include new product and service development, pricing, promotion, segmentation, customer relationship management, and Internet marketing. Prerequisite: BUS 234

ECON 240 TOPICS IN SOCIAL ECONOMICS                  3 SH
An investigation of a particular topic related to the interaction between the individual and society within an economic context. Emphasis will be placed on using the economic tools of analysis to study issues of culture, social norms, and their impact on social institutions and interactions. Possible topics for this course include health economics, the economics of happiness, the economics of education and identity economics (the role played by all aspects of identity like race and gender in determining economic interactions and outcomes).This course will typically be offered in January, and students may take it twice for credit with different topics. C-RC .

ECON 324 INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS                      3 SH
The study of the patterns of international trade in goods, services, and financial instruments. Topics will include trade models, trade policies, international factor movements, balance of payments, exchange rate determination, and international macroeconomics. Prerequisite: ECON 221 and 222, or consent of instructor.

ECON 342 AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS                       3 SH
This course is designed to introduce the student to the basic concepts in Agricultural Economics. This course will explore the role of agriculture in development, the determinants of a farmer’s production and marketing decisions, food policy and its impact on health and poverty, the evolution and importance of agricultural policy, the role of risk and risk management options, and the relationship between agriculture, trade, and the environment. Prerequisite: ECON 221 or consent of instructors.

ECON T34 ECONOMICS AND THE IDEAL SOCIETY       3 SH
Economists over the last 350 years have probed the range and attributes of human behavior.  In light of these investigations they often ask philosophical questions about what constitutes an ideal society with a particular emphasis on fairness and well-being.  This course looks at the writings of notable economists who tackle issues such as fairness, equality, distribution, and social well-being.  Their works will be analyzed and compared to trace these questions and the answers proposed.  The course will begin with writers of the 17th century and progress through current scholars. C-4PH.

EDUC 203 LEARNING THROUGH MOVEMENT               3 SH
Course addresses the implementation of interdisciplinary instruction that includes fundamental concepts and processes of dance, theatre, and physical education.  It will include methods, resources and assessment strategies for integrating dance, theatre, and physical education throughout the elementary curriculum to meet the needs of all learners.

EDUC 205 CREATIVITY IN THE CLASSROOM                3 SH
Course addresses the implementation of interdisciplinary instruction that includes fundamental concepts and basic processes of the fine arts.  It will include methods, resources and assessment strategies for integrating the fine arts throughout the elementary curriculum to meet the needs of all learners. 

EDUC 225 INFANTS AND TODDLERS                           3 SH
This course emphasizes teaching strategies based on the stages of development from birth to three years of age using scientifically-based research. Teacher candidates enrolled in this course will demonstrate performance of National Association of Education of Young Children Professional Teacher Standards. Prerequisites: EDUC 130, 223. Fall and January Session.

EDUC 242 LITERACY IN THE CONTENT AREAS             3 SH
An overview of literacy skills and reading strategies.  This course is intended for secondary education and P-12 education majors with an emphasis on engaging readers in textbook reading using research-based reading strategies.  Students enrolled in the course will demonstrate performance of literacy standards through planning developmentally appropriate reading instruction. Prerequisite: EDUC 111.

EDUC 351 CLASSROOM MGMT/CONFLICT RESOLUTION: ELEM SCHOOLS      3 SH
The study of current models of classroom discipline and conflict resolution and mediation in schools. Students will learn strategies to manage individual and group behavior and practice skills and processes for effectively resolving and/or mediating conflicts. Taken as part of the Elementary Methods Block. Prerequisites: EDUC 230, 340.

EDUC 353 CLASSROOM MGMT/CONFLICT RESOLUTION: SECONDARY SCHOOLS       3 SH
The study of current models of classroom discipline and conflict resolution and mediation in schools. Students will learn strategies to manage individual and group behavior and practice skills and processes for effectively resolving and/or mediating conflicts. Taken semester prior to student teaching. Prerequisites: EDUC 230

EDUC 362 LITERACY AND ENGLISH LEARNERS           2 SH
Course addresses the study and application of methods of teaching English Learners (EL).  It will include principles of language learning, and their impact on content learning, how to teach specific language skills, and how to design EL courses, and language assessment tools. Future elementary teachers will develop multicultural awareness as they develop linguistic and cultural sensitivities required to adapt to EL at all stages of cultural integration.  Field experience may be required. Prerequisites: EDUC 111, 230. Concurrent enrollment in EDUC 340.

ESS 363L ADAPTED PHYSICAL ACTIVITY LABORATORY          1 SH
Students will participate in a supervised service-learning experience applying methods, materials, management, and assessment strategies to meet the psychomotor learning needs of individuals with disabilities.  Course requires practical experience in the public schools and one all day Saturday commitment.  May be repeated for a maximum of three hours.  Only one hour can be counted for the major.

HIST 341 HISTORY OF AMERICAN THOUGHT AND POPULAR CULTURE IN THE 19TH CENTURY             3 SH
An exploration of three or four different themes that were important in defining ways of thinking and cultural life in the United States during the 19th century.  The course will focus on how these ideas were understood and expressed in both the intellectual and the popular culture of the period. Prerequisite: HIST 111 OR HIST 112

IDIV T22 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT & INNOVATION    3 SH
This course will investigate how innovation and entrepreneurship affect economic development in developing economies and why these developing economies are effective incubators for innovation and entrepreneurship. C-3GC.

INTD T33 COMPUTERS AND CULTURE             3SH
This course will examine the relationship between computer technology and culture: how the one informs the other, what role the producers and consumers of technology play as agents of culture, and the effect of pervasive technology on society's progress and ethics. Areas that will be critically analyzed include intellectual property, online identity, freedom of speech, and privacy. These issues will be considered primarily in the historical context of American culture, along with variations that appear in other cultures.  Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing. GE-L, C-5CC.

MATH T23 MATHEMATICS IN CULTURE                         3 SH
This course examines the development of some aspect of mathematics at a certain place during a certain time period.  The course emphasizes how the history, geography, technology, and culture in that location and time influenced the mathematics that was developed and how the mathematics influenced those aspects of society.  Students will explore these topics while visiting the location under study. The place and era will vary and may include pre-Colombian Mexico, France in the 1600s, England in the 1700s, or Ancient Greece.  This course is designed for a general audience and may not be used for credit in the mathematics major or minor. Prerequisite: MATH 107 or higher. C-3GC

MUS 149 ATHLETIC BAND: GOLD AND BLACK ATTACK            0.5 SH
Students will prepare repertoire to perform at home basketball games from January Session to the end of the season. May be repeated.

PE 105 FITNESS AND WELLNESS ACTIVITY                 0.5 SH 
Fitness and Wellness courses may include but are not limited to biking, Core stability training, fitness walking, hydro aerobics, jogging, lifeguarding, pilates, stress reduction, swimming, tai chi, weight training, and yoga.  Lifeguarding, swimming, and hydro aerobics have additional fees.  Permission of the department chair is required to enroll in lifeguarding. Maximum credit toward a bachelor’s degree is 1.0 hours. Maximum credit toward associate degree is 0.5 hours. GE-G2, C-2PA, C-2FA
      Learning Goals:
*Knowledge and applications of scientific principles of fitness and nutrition for personal programs.
*Discussion of wellness principles related to each activity

PSYC 224 DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY               4 SH
In this course we study and apply theory and research in developmental psychology across the life-span.  Emphasis is placed on the interaction of physical, cognitive, and social aspect of development from conception to old age, death, and dying. Prerequisite: PSYC 110

PSYC 241 STATISTICS AND RESEARCH DESIGN I        4 SH
This course is designed to introduce students majoring in psychology to common statistical analysis skills rooted in the interpretation of psychological research. This course is the first in a sequence of three statistics and research design courses, and is intended to lay a strong foundation for critical statistical analytical skills required in more advanced coursework in psychology. Topics will include a review of descriptive methods, hypothesis testing, correlation and regression, analysis of variance, and an introduction to statistical analysis software. C-1Q. Prerequisite: PSYC 110, MATH 105 or placement.

PSYC 250 COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE            4 SH
This course examines the biological foundations of mental processes. Specifically, we will explore how neurons, brain structure and neural function (the biological foundation of the brain) enable cognitive processes such as attention, memory, language, decision making and thought. Prerequisite: PSYC 110

THTR T21 THEATER IN ENGLAND: VOICE, MOVEMENT AND MUSIC     3 SH
Study of English dramatic works from William Shakespeare to the present with particular attention to their use of both verbal and non-verbal elements during their original performances and through various genres in the centuries since (ballet, opera, etc).   Students will explore acting, use of dramatic voice, movement, and music in the context of various English dramatic works.  The course will culminate with a residency in England, including a workshop with actors at The Globe Theatre in London. Fee required. Prerequisite: COMM 110. C-4AR.

JANUARY 2012 OFF-CAMPUS COURSES

Off-campus courses are marked as OC on the Schedule of Classes.  Contact the instructor for more details about individual travel courses.                                                              

ART 251 Art in Context  GE-I1, C-4AR

Instructor: Thelma Rohrer
Location: Spain
This course will be conducted throughout cities in Spain and will include visits to major museums and historic sites. Spanish is not required for the art course. The course can also be taken as an Art elective, hours toward graduation, or an audit. GE-I1, C-4AR
More information: Contact Professor Rohrer at tsrohrer@manchester.edu.

BUS 485 Seminar: Snow Business
Instructor: Joe Messer
Location: Prague, capital of the Czech Republic
This course will examine the winter sports industry. We will fly to Prague and spend 13 days visiting a chairlift manufacture, a pistenbull -snowcat service center, a rock climbing center, a ski and snowboard manufacture, several clothing / fashion marketers and two ski resort tourism centers. The focus will be on looking at how product and services move through the distribution channel from Research and Development to Manufacturing to Retail. 5 of our days will be partially used to ski or board. All lessons and equipment is provided. The trip is for novices to experts with instructors for every level, even if you have never boarded before. The trip will culminate with 2 days in Prague looking at the history of the city with a focus on the Jewish heritage.

More information: See Professor Messer in A309 for more info or e-mail at jrmesser02@manchester.edu

HIST 252 Comparative Civilization C-3GC
Instructor: Mark Angelos
Location: Britain and Ireland
Explore Irish and British history and culture through travel in January.  Our itinerary includes: Galway and Dublin in Ireland; Conwy Castle in Wales; Stirling Castle and Edinburgh in Scotland; and Liverpool, York, Oxford, Stonehenge, and London in England, plus more.

More information: Please contact Dr. Mark Angelos (mangelos@manchester.edu) for details.

IDIV T22 Economic Development and Innovation GE-M2, C-3GC
Instructors: Sree Majumder and Jim Falkiner
Location: India
This course answers the question, “Why are U.S. jobs going to India?” The class jets to India to see with our own eyes why jobs are leaving the U.S. and going cities like Mumbai and Bangalore. We will visit rural villages where entrepreneurs thrive and also see large Indian and US corporations doing global business in India. We will visit two of India’s premier universities, The Indian Institute of Management and the Indian Institute of Technology and meet Indian students. We will see the slums of Mumbai where the Oscar winning Indian film Slumdog Millionaire was filmed. In India we travel by train to visit temples, castles and the famous Gir National Forest while making a special side- trip to Gandhi’s Sabarmati Ashram. This course combines entrepreneurship with economics to observe and report on how Indian and American businesses jockey for position in our Global Economy.

More information: Contact Jim Falkiner at jrfalkiner@manchester.edu or Professor Majumder at smajumder@manchester.edu

INTD 445 Development of Modern Scientific Thought In Great Britain    GE-L, C-5CC
Instructor:  Susan Klein
Location: Great Britain
This courses examines the contributions of British scientists to the development if modern scientific theory.  By visiting museums and historical sites in Great Britain, the lives and works of many scientists will be explored.  The influences of the environment in which these scientists lived will be examined from the perspective of history, politics, social structure, and religion.  The period of scientific achievement and discovery begins in the 17th century, and effects of culture and society then, and now, will be addressed. GE-L, C-5CC

More information: Contact Dr Klein for application and information

MATH T23 Math in Culture C-3GC
Instructor: Tim Brauch
Location: Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico
The general theme for this course is how math has influenced history, politics, and the development of cultures. For January Session 2012 we will focus on the mathematics, culture, and astronomy of the Maya in the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico. Everyday life of the Maya was, and for many still is, determined by the alignment of the calendar, even the construction of temples was dictated by the calendar and by astronomy. The “21012 Doomsday” prophecies are a great example of how math has influenced culture and will be a significant part of our discussions in this course.

More information: Contact Professor Brauch at tmbrauch@manchester.edu.

PSYC 301 Social Psychology  GE-M1, C-3RC
Instructor: Marcie Coulter-Kern
Location: Hawaii
More Information: Contact Professor Marcie Coulter-Kern.

PSYC 352 Culture & Psychology GE-M1, C-3GC
Instructor: Rusty Coulter-Kern
Location: Hawaii
More Information: Contact Professor Rusty Coulter-Kern.

SOC-230 ASPECTS OF AMERICAN POPULAR CULTURE: DISNEY AND AMERICAN CULTURE
Instructor: Robert Pettit
An examination of American cultural values as expressed and disseminated through mass-mediated popular culture, using the Disney empire and its products as a case study. Class meets for 7 days on campus, then for a week in Walt Disney World, Florida. Expenses: ~$500-600 to be paid at the Financial Services Office (covers WDW lodging, behind-the-scenes tour, and course costs), plus your own arrangements for travel to Florida, meals, and WDW ticket.

SPAN 230 Living the Spanish Language
Instructor: Arturo Yanez
Location: Spain
This is a terrific opportunity for students of all majors who wish to practice the Spanish language in daily communication and on site. Spanish is required. C-3GC
More information: Contact Professor Yanez.


THTR T21 Theater in England
Instructors: Debra Lynn and Jane Frazier
Location: England

Study English dramatic works from Shakespeare to present - including state plays, operas, and ballet. Explore acting, use of dramatic voice, movement, and music in the context of English dramatic works. Embark on a residency in England, including a Shakespeare workshop at the Globe Theatre and a stage combat workshop at the London Academy of Music and Dramatic Arts. GE-I1, C-4AR
More information: Contact Professor Lynn.

ADDITIONAL JANUARY SESSION OPPORTUNITIES

 Many colleges across the country offer a January Session similar to Manchester’s. Students who would like to experience life on another campus may elect to attend another college during January Session.  Colleges attended in previous January Sessions or who have invited Manchester University students to attend include:

 

Huntington University (Indiana)

McPherson College (Kansas)

Saint Olaf College (Minnesota)

University of La Verne (California)

 

Contact the Registrar for more information.