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Pathways: Serving Others,
Growing Self >

Graduation to be broadcast
LIVE online >

Manchester student-athletes
excel in the classroom >

Office of Career Services -
Finding a Job Made Easier >


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ISSUE #22 May 2009

Caitlin Haynes '08 utilized a Pathways Imagination Grant
last summer to work with youth in Quito, Ecuador.

Pathways: Serving Others, Growing Self
Jennifer Fisher, Pathways Coordinator

Often we think of changing the world as a large task that we cannot accomplish alone. But in reality, it is small movements and moments that change individuals, who, one at a time, ultimately change the world. For 10 Manchester College students, this summer will be an opportunity to change the world through small, but powerful, interactions throughout the U.S. By participating in a service learning program called Pathways, these students will explore the intersection between their sense of vocational calling and faith and service to others.

Pathways, now in its ninth summer, has been providing Manchester College students with service experiences in homeless shelters, hospice homes, organic gardens, summer camps, hospitality homes, catholic worker houses and other venues. Funded through a generous grant from Lilly Endowment, Inc., as well as individual donations, Pathways allows students to spend 10 summer weeks in service organizations around the U.S., learning valuable life lessons and interacting with unprivileged populations. It’s been a life-changing experience for not just students, but for the many people with whom they come in contact.

Meet this year’s Pathways participants and follow their experiences throughout the summer by reading their blogs at www.manchester.edu/OSD/Pathways.

FACT: In 2007-08, MC Students contributed 19,500 hours of service to their College and communities.


Graduation to be broadcast LIVE online

We hope you can come to campus for graduation day, but if you can’t, you can watch both Baccalaureate and Commencement services live on the Manchester College website. The live feed will be available beginning at 11 a.m., Sunday, May 24, for Baccalaureate service and will continue at 2:30 p.m. for Commencement.  A high-speed internet connection will be necessary to view the broadcast. After the event, a link to a recorded broadcast can be found on the same web page.

View the broadcast on graduation day at http://www.manchester.edu/common/graduation/broadcast.aspx.
If you do plan to attend in person, you can find other useful information, including links to directions and accommodations, here.



Manchester student-athletes excel in the classroom

With 17 intercollegiate sports and up to 75 percent of the student body participating in intramural athletics, it's no surprise that sports can be an important part of life at Manchester College. An opportunity to participate in NCAA Division III athletics often helps students to find their place at Manchester when choosing a college. But unlike other schools, Manchester places special importance on the positive effect athletic competition has on student-athletes, rather than focusing on collegiate sports as entertainment.

Student-athletes at Manchester are always expected to be students first. Whether or not they’re allowed to compete depends on it. Student-athletes must maintain at least a 2.0 GPA and carry at least 12 credit hours to stay eligible.

But considering the discipline and mindset it takes to compete as athletes, seldom is an inadequate GPA a problem. In fact, of the 260 students who made the Fall 2008 Dean’s List, 68 are student-athletes who have the necessary 3.5 GPA or higher.

Added support comes from coaches – many require their team members to participate in study tables and workshops to improve their study skills.

Spartan baseball player Matty Miller knows well the benefits that athletics can have on the college experience. “Being a student-athlete gives you a structure that sometimes other students may not have,” he said. “You have to constantly find a balance between practice, studies and social activities. Living the student-athlete life in college forces you to have a schedule on a day-to-day basis and, consequently, helps you academically and to be an organized adult later in life. You will also make some of your best friends in your life through athletics. I would never change my choice about playing athletics in college.”


Office of Career Services - Finding a Job Made Easier

Manchester College is dedicated to the success of our graduates, and the Office of Career Services (OCS) is here to help! Services include:

  • strategies for finding a job
  • assistance with graduate school applications
  • resume and cover letter reviews
  • interviewing practice
  • negotiating advice
  • networking ideas
  • job listings
  • successful practices on the job

A variety of helpful information is available on the OCS website. Family and friends seeking to support graduates in their job searches will find additional helpful advice here. Visit Career Services in the Union, call 260-982-5242, or e-mail mcocareers@manchester.edu.



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