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Academic Program > Major and Minor Fields of Study > Exercise and Sport Sciences

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Exercise and Sport Sciences

Chair Mark W. Huntington, Jeffrey A. Beer, Matthew N. Burlingame, Brian R. Cashdollar, Kim A. Duchane, Joshua N. Dzurick, Richard B. Espeset, Erin R. Foreman, W. Shannon Griffith, Ryan A. Hedstrom, Mark W. Huntington, Kendra Marlowe, Brad L. Nadborne, Ronald H. Planz II, Andrew M. Stout

The goal of the department is to develop knowledgeable and skillful leaders and practitioners in various fields of exercise and sport sciences. Students will be cognizant of scientific principles underlying movement patterns and analyses, as well as physiological, psychological and sociological perspectives of sport and fitness participation and management.

Formal application to the athletic training, exercise science and fitness, and sport management majors is made typically in either the spring semester of the first year (deadline: April 15) or the fall semester of the sophomore year (deadline: December 1). Application to the physical education teaching major is made by December 1 of the sophomore year. Application forms for the majors are in the Exercise and Sport Sciences Student Handbook, available on the ESS department web page.

Baccalaureate Degrees

Athletic Training Major
Students are prepared for Board of Certification (BOC) certification eligibility and entry level athletic training positions in a variety of health care settings.

This is a four-year program leading to the Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Arts degree. This program has full accreditation by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE). Technical standards for the major are published in the Athletic Training Major Handbook.

Students successfully completing all clinical and didactic components of the athletic training major are eligible to take the BOC certification examination in athletic training.

Admission to Athletic Training Major
The number of admissions to the athletic training major is necessarily limited to the number of clinical spaces available. Application to the athletic training major typically occurs in the spring of the student’s first year. To be eligible for admission to the major, the following requirements must be met:

  1. Completion of ESS 113 and 150 with a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.50 in these courses;
  2. Completion of at least 12 semester hours of college credit;
  3. Completion of at least 75 hours of directed observation experience in the Manchester College athletic training room;
  4. Successful completion of all clinical skills presented in ESS 113 and 150;
  5. Attendance at one professional conference;
  6. Completion of interview with the Athletic Training Admission Committee;
  7. Submission of a portfolio.

Major in athletic training, 57 hours: BIOL 202,202L, 204, 204L; ESS 106, 113, 150, 150L, 200, 231, 240, 243, 246, 247, 251, 253, 270, 273, 325, 325L, 330, 335, 370, 373, 410, 411, 414, 470, 473.

Completion of a portfolio, an exit interview, and successful completion of a designated set of examinations administered during ESS 411 and scoring at least 80 percent on each portion will constitute the senior comprehensive evaluation for the athletic training major. Details are available from the program director of athletic training.

Exercise Science and Fitness Major
This major prepares students for programs in one of the exercise sciences (e.g., biomechanics, exercise physiology, pre-occupational therapy, pre-physical therapy). It is an appropriate preparation for graduate school, or for entry-level positions in fitness and wellness.

Major in exercise science and fitness, Core: ESS 103, 200, 325, 325L, 410, 476.

Exercise science concentration, 51 hours: BIOL 202, 202L, 204, 204L, 422, 422L; MATH 210; CHEM 105, 105L and 106, 106L or CHEM 111, 111L and 211, 211L; 12 hours of directed electives approved by department chair.

Fitness and recreation concentration, 47 hours: ESS 111, 205, 206, 209, 243, 250, 260, 276, 345, 414; 12 hours of directed electives approved by department chair.

Sport Management Major
This major prepares students to work in the sports industry. Careers in this field include, but are certainly not limited to, event and facility management, sport marketing and promotion, and leadership in scholastic/intercollegiate and private athletic settings.

Application to the sport management major typically occurs in the spring of the student's first year. To be eligible for admission to the major, the following requirements must be met:

  1. Completion of ESS 105 and BUS 120 with a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.30 in these courses;
  2. Completion of at least 12 semester hours;
  3. Completion of the application packet and portfolio (available on the ESS website);
  4. Completion of interview with the Sport Management Admission Committee.

Upon completing the sophomore year, sport management majors must have earned a cumulative GPA of 2.3 in major courses before continuing with any ESS 300 and 400 level sport management courses.

Major in sport management, Core: ACCT 211; BUS 120; COMM 341; ECON 221; ESS 105, 204, 240, 275, 305, 307, 309, 405, 478.

Business concentration, 53-56 hours: nine hours selected from: BUS 301, 305, 310, 337, 340, 350, 414, 420, 448; NPM 201.

Communication concentration, 53-56 hours: nine hours selected from: COMM 210, 232, 260, 335, 362; ENG 201, 317; ESS 202.

Successful completion of a portfolio, oral presentation, and topic essays during ESS 405 will constitute the senior comprehensive evaluation for the sport management major. Details are available from the ESS 405 course instructor.

Physical Education Teacher Education Majors

Students may elect to major in teacher education and earn any of the following teaching certifications:

  • All-Grade Teaching Major in Adapted Physical Education
  • All-Grade Teaching Major in Health and Physical Education
  • All-Grade Teaching Major in Physical Education

Requirements for the teaching majors are available from the department chair or the Office of Teacher Education.

Exercise science and fitness, sport management, and physical education teaching majors must successfully complete the senior comprehensive evaluation. Details are published in the ESS Student Handbook on the department web page.

Minors

Adapted physical activity minor - chosen by students who want basic knowledge and skills for modifying physical activity for individuals of varying abilities.


Adapted physical activity minor, 21-25 hours: ESS 276, 363, 485, (BIOL 204, 204L) 335 or 343; nine hours selected from: ESS 103, 145, 243, 414, 476, 499.

Athletic training minor — Students gain knowledge in theoretical background of care and prevention of athletic injuries.

Athletic training minor, 22-23 hours: BIOL 202, 204, 204L; ESS 111, 150; 11 to 12 hours from: ESS 200, 240, 243, 246, 251, 325, 330, 335, 345.

Coaching minor — This option prepares students for coaching at various levels within a community. Scientific, psychological and administrative principles are presented that focus on appropriate coaching behaviors with young people.

Coaching minor, 21 hours: ESS 111, 150, 209, 235, 325, 410; two to six hours selected from ESS 210, 211, 212, 214, 215, 218; Electives (two to six hours) chosen from BIOL 204 and 204L, ESS 145, 223, 243, 275 or 475, 345, 385, 414.

Physical education minor — This focus is chosen by students in another discipline who want basic knowledge and skills of physical education for alternative career options.

Physical education minor, 28 hours: BIOL 204, 204L; ESS 103, 111, 145, 205, 206, 243, 250, 260, 325 or 345, 410, 414.

Courses ESS

103 FOUNDATIONS OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND SPORT SCIENCES - 2 hours
An introduction to the historical, philosophical, sociological and psychological foundations that provide the framework for diverse career opportunities in physical education and sport sciences. Fall.

105 INTRODUCTION TO SPORT MANAGEMENT - 2 hours
An investigation into the relationships, goals, and missions within the sport industry. Areas of study include the history and evolution of sport management, current trends in the profession, career options and professional development, and an introduction into the major areas of the field. Fall.

106 MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY FOR ALLIED HEALTH - 1 hour
Self-paced instruction in the essentials of medical terminology including word roots, suffixes, prefixes, terms of anatomical orientation, commonly-used abbreviations, and medical specialty nomenclature.

111 FIRST AID - 1 hour
The principles and procedures of standard first aid and infant and child CPR are covered. Students will combine theoretical and practical work to gain Red Cross certifications. In addition, preventive injury concepts and introductory taping and wrapping techniques will be presented. Fall. Spring.

113 EMERGENCY CARE FOR THE PHYSICALLY ACTIVE - 3 hours
Emergency management of common injuries in the physically active population. Includes CPR for the professional rescuer, use of automatic external defibrillators, spine-boarding and fracture-splinting techniques. Emphasis is on recognition, assessment and immediate treatment of injuries and illnesses. Spring.

145 MOTOR DEVELOPMENT - 3 hours
A study of the progressive change in movement behavior throughout life from infancy through older adulthood. Emphasis is placed upon developing the ability to identify the stages in a variety of motor skills. Attention will also be given to the study of physical growth patterns and biological maturity and the relationship of each to motor performance. Fall.

150 INJURY AND ILLNESS PREVENTION FOR THE PHYSICALLY ACTIVE - 3 hours
A survey of strategies for the prevention of injury and illness in the physically active population. Topics include prophylactic taping, padding and bracing techniques, protective equipment, universal precautions and disease transmission, and environmental threats to safety. Fall.

150L INJURY AND ILLNESS PREVENTION LABORATORY - 1 hour
Laboratory to accompany ESS 150. Emphasis on clinical techniques to develop prophylactic taping, padding, bracing, protective equipment, and universal precaution skills. Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in ESS 150.

200 BASIC PRINCIPLES OF NUTRITION - 3 hours
Basic nutrition with emphasis on the principles and theories of the function and interrelationships of the nutrients. The application of nutrition for the needs of the various life stages. Therapeutic diets are reviewed. Research paper is required. Fall.

202 SPORT INFORMATION PRACTICES - 3 hours

Investigates the fundamentals of communicating in a sports environment. Topics include sports information in print and broadcasting, as well as public relations. Statistical methods and record keeping used in scholastic and professional levels of sport will also be presented. January, odd years.

204 EVENT AND FACILITY MANAGEMENT - 3 hours
Examines the processes of planning, constructing, equipping, and maintaining athletic and recreation facilities. The multi-faceted nature of event planning, organizing, and management will be examined in a variety of settings. Fall. Prerequisite: ESS 105 or consent of instructor.

205 TEACHING TEAM ACTIVITIES - 3 hours
Students will develop personal skills, learn basic rules, and focus on teaching progressions, analyzing skills, and selecting appropriate skill tests for specific team activities. Concurrent enrollment in ESS 250. Fall.

206 TEACHING INDIVIDUAL AND DUAL ACTIVITIES - 3 hours
Students will develop personal skills, learn basic rules, and focus on teaching progressions, analyzing skills, and selecting appropriate skill tests for specific individual and dual sports, and noncompetitive lifetime activities. Concurrent enrollment in ESS 260. Prerequisite: ESS 205 and 250. Spring.

208 READINGS IN NUTRITION - 1 hour
A review of recent publications in the area of nutrition and evaluation by the students. Spring, even years.

209 PRINCIPLES OF COACHING - 2 hours
An overview of basic techniques and procedures involved in coaching at the elementary through secondary level. Administrative, scientific and psychological concepts facing the coach are discussed. Spring.

210-218 - COACHING
Coaching techniques, fundamental skills, conditioning and rules relating to participation and management of meets and games. Methods of coaching a specific system as it relates to the sport.

210 COACHING OF BASKETBALL - 2 hours
Fall, even years.

211 COACHING OF BASEBALL/SOFTBALL - 2 hours
Spring, even years.

212 COACHING OF FOOTBALL - 2 hours
Fall, odd years.

213 COACHING OF SOCCER - 2 hours
Spring, odd years.

214 COACHING OF TRACK AND FIELD - 2 hours
Spring, even years.

215 COACHING OF VOLLEYBALL - 2 hours
Fall, odd years.

218 COACHING OF WRESTLING - 2 hours
Fall, even years.

222 WATER SAFETY INSTRUCTION - 2 hours
Students are prepared to be certified teachers of American Red Cross swimming courses. Classroom instruction and practical skills are assessed. Prerequisite swimming skills will be tested at beginning of course. Note: This course does not certify students to become lifeguards. See PE 101 Lifeguarding. Spring, odd years.

223 OFFICIATING - 0.5 hour
An in-depth study of officiating techniques and rules of selected sports. Students may earn officiating certification through the IHSAA. May be repeated with different sports for a total of two hours of credit. Fall: basketball, football, gymnastics, soccer, swimming, volleyball, wrestling. Spring: baseball, softball, track and field.

231 MEDICAL DIAGNOSTIC IMAGING - 1 hour
A study and assessment of various diagnostic imaging being used in the present medical field. Class will be led by guest speakers from the medical profession, doctors, radiologist, etc. Students will focus on type, rationale for use, and history of diagnostic imaging techniques. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor.


235 DRUG AND ALCOHOL EDUCATION - 1 hour
A course designed to identify current drug and alcohol use within communities and to develop strategies for effective educational programs at various levels. Fall.

237 SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES/HIV EDUCATION - 1 hour
The course will investigate current information on sexually transmitted diseases and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome and formulate appropriate teaching methods to be used at various levels. Fall.

239 METHODS OF TEACHING STRESS REDUCTION - 1 hour
The physiological and psychological foundations of stress on the human body are investigated. Students identify and practice teaching methods of stress reduction for various populations. Spring, even years.

240 ETHICS AND PSYCHOSOCIAL ASPECTS OF SPORT - 3 hours
A study of current theories of behavioral change and their application in sport psychology. Also included is the impact of social factors such as group dynamics, leadership, and socio-cultural aspects. An emphasis is on the application of skills to help both the competing and injured athlete cope with psychological aspects of injuries, rehabilitation, motivation, and performance enhancement. Discussion of coping skills includes: feedback, rewards, confidence training, goal setting, and visualization. Ethical implications relating to the fields of sport psychology and sport sociology will be discussed. January, even years.

243 PRINCIPLES OF FITNESS - 2 hours
A lecture/laboratory course which investigates basic principles of safe and effective exercise prescription for all age levels. Students will identify strengths and weaknesses of existing fitness testing programs and will field test selected programs with appropriate age groups including self-testing. Students design suitable exercise programs based on test results. Spring.

246 MEDICAL CONSIDERATIONS FOR THE PHYSICALLY ACTIVE - 3 hours
A survey of non-orthopedic conditions and other factors which affect participation in physical activity. Topics included are diabetes, seizure disorders, the effects of various pharmacological agents, and the evaluation of systemic illness by athletic trainers. Spring, even years.

247 PHARMACOLOGY FOR ALLIED HEALTH - 1 hour
This course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of pharmacology emphasizing drug law, routes of administration, basic pharmacokinetics, and the specific pharmacology of drugs commonly used in physical medicine. Permission of instructor required. Prerequisites: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in ESS 246.

250 TEACHING LABORATORY 1 - 1 hour
An introductory practice teaching experience in physical education with school-age children in an on-campus clinical teaching setting under the direct supervision of a physical educator. Concurrent enrollment in ESS 205. Fall.

251 MUSCULOSKELETAL ASSESSMENT: UPPER EXTREMITY - 3 hours
Advanced physical assessment of injury and pathology of the upper extremity, cervical spine, thorax, and abdomen. Proper documentation of clinical findings is also addressed and practiced. Prerequisite: ESS 113, completion of or concurrent enrollment in BIOL 202. Spring.

253 MUSCULOSKELETAL ASSESSMENT: LOWER EXTREMITY - 3 hours
This course focuses on the principles of orthopedic examination and assessment. Emphasis will be placed on the components of the comprehensive orthopedic clinical evaluation and diagnosis including: history, inspection, palpation, functional testing, and special evaluation techniques of the lumbar spine and lower extremity. Prerequisites: BIOL 204, ESS 113, completion of or concurrent enrollment in BIOL 202.

260 TEACHING LABORATORY 2 - 1 hour
The second practical experience in teaching school-age children in an on-campus clinical setting applies instructional strategies covered in ESS 206. Students are under the direct supervision of a physical educator. Concurrent enrollment in ESS 206. Prerequisite: ESS 250. Spring.

270 CLINICAL EXPERIENCE IN ATHLETIC TRAINING I - 1 hour
In this first level of clinical experience in athletic training, students have the opportunity to apply clinical techniques addressed in ESS 113 and 150. Students are under the direct supervision of an athletic training clinical instructor in an athletic training setting. Prerequisite: permission of a clinical instructor. Fall. Spring.

273 FIELD EXPERIENCE IN ATHLETIC TRAINING I - 1 hour
First level of field experience in an athletic training setting under the supervision of a certified athletic trainer. Students will be assigned to a particular patient population in a particular health care setting. Prerequisite: ESS 270. Fall. Spring.

275 PRACTICUM IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION/SPORT MANAGEMENT - 1-4 hours
Designed to give students supervised work in varsity or intramural sports, physical education classes at any level, recreation settings or sport management settings. The course focuses on administrative aspects of chosen placement and participation suitable to the student’s expertise. Sport management students must complete a two-hour block of practicum under the direction of a faculty advisor. May be repeated for a maximum of four hours. Prerequisite: prior written approval by department chair.

276 PRACTICUM IN HEALTH/FITNESS/WELLNESS - 1-4 hours
Observation of and participation in a health, fitness or wellness setting. The focus is on allowing the student to observe and participate in the activities related to the particular setting. Practical application of previous learning is expected without a high level of professional responsibility. May be repeated for a maximum of four hours. Prerequisite: Prior written approval by department chair.

301 TEACHING FUNDAMENTAL MOVEMENT ACTIVITIES - 3 hours
Methods for teaching fundamental motor skills and developmentally appropriate physical education activities based on the needs, interest and characteristics of the elementary school child are stressed within an interdisciplinary context. Concurrent enrollment with ESS 350 (waived for elementary education majors). Prerequisite: ESS 206, 260, and successful completion of Praxis I (elementary education majors exempted from all prerequisites). Fall.

303 TEACHING GYMNASTICS AND RHYTHMIC ACTIVITIES - 3 hours
Methods for teaching tumbling, apparatus and rhythmic activities, including teaching progressions, analyzing skills, selecting appropriate skill tests, and designing interdisciplinary activities. Concurrent enrollment in ESS 360. Prerequisite: ESS 301 and 350. Spring.

305 SPORT BUSINESS - 2 hours
Business concepts will be applied to the sport industry. Topics such as marketing, public relations, advertising, and sales will be examined within the many settings of the sport industry. Spring.

307 SPORT LEADERSHIP AND GOVERNANCE - 3 hours

Examines the organizational structure of a variety of athletic settings. Issues such as organizational leadership, league structure, conferencing of scholastic/intercollegiate sports, and professional sport governance in a variety of settings will be examined. Prerequisite: ESS 105. Spring.

309 LEGAL ASPECTS OF SPORT AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY - 3 hours
Examines legal concepts related to sport and physical activity, including participation and eligibility issues, constitutional due process, Title IX and related constitutional amendments, facility and employment contracts, and tort law applications to participants and spectators. Prerequisite: ESS 105 or permission of instructor. Fall.

320 COMMUNITY HEALTH - 3 hours
An overview of health issues relevant to school, community and public health educators including athletic trainers, fitness personnel, teachers and physical therapists. Attention will be given to topics such as health care delivery systems, drug testing and screening, environmental and consumer health, disease prevention and health promotion. Fall, even years.

325 EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY (W) - 3 hours
A course investigating the various physiological adaptations which occur in the human body as a result of physical activity. The functions of various organs and systems involved in these adaptations will be reviewed. Commonly used physical training techniques and the physiological bases for their use are presented. Prerequisite: BIOL 204 and 204L; or consent of instructor; ENG 111. Fall.

325L EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY LABORATORY - 1 hour

Laboratory experience in collection and analysis of human physiological responses to both acute and chronic exercise. Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in ESS 325.


330 THERAPEUTIC MODALITIES IN ATHLETIC TRAINING - 3 hours
A survey of the therapeutic modalities commonly employed in athletic training and other rehabilitation settings. Theory, indications and contraindications for use, and practical application of ultrasound, electrical stimulation, intermittent compression, and various heating and cooling modalities in the treatment of athletic injuries are addressed. Prerequisite: ESS 150. Spring.

333 HEALTH EDUCATION - 3 hours
Course emphasizing current topics in health and total wellness, and exposing the student to creative procedures for teaching health in a student-centered classroom. Fall, odd years.

335 THERAPEUTIC EXERCISE - 3 hours
Theory and techniques of restoration of muscular flexibility, strength, endurance and functional ability following injury. Topics included are joint mobilization, proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation, and other selected rehabilitation strategies and modalities. Prerequisites: BIOL 204 and 204L. Fall.

343 AGING: HEALTH AND WELLNESS - 3 hours
Students will study problems and concerns related to health, fitness and wellness in the aging population. Special emphasis will be given to exercise and strength training. Practical experience with older adults is required. January, odd years.

345 STRUCTURAL ANATOMY - 3 hours
A course that qualitatively investigates the principles of mechanics as they relate to the performance of motor skills. Special emphasis is placed on skill analysis through visual observation, video taping and musculoskeletal anatomy. Prerequisite: BIOL 204 and 204L, or consent of instructor. Spring.

350 TEACHING LABORATORY 3 - 1 hour
The third practical experience in teaching phycial education to elementary-age children in an on-campus clinical setting applies instructional strategies covered in ESS 301. Students are under the direct supervision of a physical educator. Concurrent enrollment in ESS 301. Prerequisite: ESS 260 (waived for elementary education majors). Fall.

360 TEACHING LABORATORY 4 - 1 hour
The fourth practical experience in teaching physical education to elementary-age children in an on-campus clinical setting applies instructional strategies covered in ESS 303. Students are under the direct supervision of a physical educator. Concurrent enrollment in ESS 303. Prerequisite: ESS 350. Spring.

363 ADAPTED PHYSICAL ACTIVITY - 3 hours
A study of general characteristics of individuals with various disabilities and their capabilities in movement performance. Consideration is given to the means of assessing the performance of people of varying abilities, the process for referral and placement in the least restrictive environment, and ways of modifying environment and physical activity to meet the needs of individuals across the lifespan. Field experience required. Spring.

370 CLINICAL EXPERIENCE IN ATHLETIC TRAINING II - 1 hour
The second level of clinical experiences for athletic training students. Opportunities are provided for students to apply the clinical techniques covered in ESS 243, 251, 253, 330 and BIOL 202. Students are under the direct supervision of an athletic training clinical instructor in an athletic training setting. Prerequisites: ESS 243, 251, 270, 330; BIOL 202; and permission of a clinical instructor. Fall. Spring.

373 FIELD EXPERIENCE IN ATHLETIC TRAINING II - 1 hour
Second level of field experience in an athletic training setting under the supervision of a certified athletic trainer. Students will be assigned to a specific patient population in a particular health care setting. Prerequisite: ESS 370. Fall. Spring.

405 TOPICS IN SPORT MANAGEMENT - 3 hours
Provides an integration of prior coursework and experience in sport management, preparation for and support during the internship experience, and a forum for discussion of sport management issues of current concern. Concurrent enrollment in ESS 478 desirable. Senior standing and permission of the instructor.

410 ADMINISTRATION OF HEALTH AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY PROGRAMS (W) - 3 hours
Management and leadership techniques for diverse careers in health and physical activity programs are presented. Topics include: program design and evaluation, fiscal administration, risk management, human resources, public relations, facility design and other relevant issues. Prerequisite: ENG 111. Fall.

411 TOPICS IN ATHLETIC TRAINING - 1 hour
Provides an integration of prior coursework and expertise in athletic training, preparation for the BOC Certification Exam, and forum for discussion of athletic training issues of current concern. Prerequisite: ESS 251.

414 ADVANCED PRINCIPLES OF EXERCISE PRESCRIPTION - 2 hours
A study of advanced fitness principles of assessment and exercise prescription. Exploration of current research including applications of exercise physiology, exercise adherence, motivation theory, and prescription for special populations. Students will complete supervised hours in the Brown Fitness Center. Prerequisite: BIOL 204, 204L; ESS 243. Spring.

440 TEACHING METHODS OF HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION - 3 hours
An examination of K-12 health and physical education curricula, effective teaching methods, classroom materials and assessment of student learning. Students will participate in 20 hours of observation and teaching experience in a public school classroom. Must be taken the semester prior to student teaching. Prerequisite: formal approval to student teach. Fall.

470 CLINICAL EXPERIENCE IN ATHLETIC TRAINING III - 1 hour
This course is the third level of clinical experiences for athletic training students. Opportunities are provided for students to apply the clinical techniques covered in ESS 325 and 335. Students are under the direct supervision of an athletic training clinical instructor in an athletic training setting. Prerequisites: ESS 246, 325, 335, 370 and permission of a clinical instructor. Fall. Spring.

473 FIELD EXPERIENCE IN ATHLETIC TRAINING III - 1 hour
Third level of field experience in an athletic training setting under the supervision of a certified athletic trainer. Students will be assigned to a particular patient population in a particular health care setting. Prerequisite: ESS 470. Fall. Spring.

475 INTERNSHIP IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION/SPORT MANAGEMENT - 1-4 hours
Work experience in the area of coaching, physical education, or sports administration. This experience links classroom instruction to actual career responsibilities. The student is supervised by a professional employed by the specific agency. Open only to juniors and seniors. May be repeated for a maximum of four hours. Prerequisite: approval by department chair.

476 INTERNSHIP IN HEALTH/FITNESS/WELLNESS - 1-4 hours
Work experience in the area of health, fitness or wellness. This experience links classroom instruction to actual career responsibilities. The student is supervised by a professional employed by the specific agency. Open only to juniors and seniors. May be repeated for a maximum of four hours. Prerequisite: approval by department chair.

477 INTERNSHIP IN ATHLETIC TRAINING - 1-6 hours
Application of classroom theory to actual athletic training practice. Includes supervised injury evaluation, immediate care and long-term rehabilitation of athletic injuries, as well as experience in the administrative aspects of athletic training services. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours. Prerequisite: approval by department chair.

478 INTERNSHIP IN SPORT MANAGEMENT - 9-12 hours

Work experience in the area of sport management. This course requires on-site supervised hands-on experience in the sport management field. In addition to the hours, students will be responsible for close contact with a faculty supervisor, proposal development and writing, and reflecting on the experience. Further information about application to and successful completion of this course can be found in the ESS Student Handbook. Concurrent enrollment in ESS 405 desirable. Prerequisites: Senior standing and permission of the instructor.

499 SENIOR RESEARCH PROJECT - 3 hours
Supervised research into a physical education topic of interest. Prerequisite: second semester junior or senior status as an exercise science major.

380 or 480 SPECIAL PROBLEMS - 1-4 hours
A student who has demonstrated ability to work independently may propose a course and pursue it with a qualified and willing professor. The department chair and the vice president for academic affairs must also approve. A set of guidelines is available at the Office of the Registrar.

385 or 485 SEMINAR - 1-4 hours
An in-depth consideration of a significant scholarly problem or issue. Students pursue a supervised, independent inquiry on an aspect of the topic and exchange results through reports and discussions.

Physical Education Activity Courses
Students are encouraged to select physical education activities to learn new lifetime skills. Students should not take activity courses in which they can already perform the basic fundamentals.

PE 101 PHYSICAL EDUCATION ACTIVITY - 0.5 hour
Activity courses may include, but are not limited to: aquatics, badminton, ballroom dancing, canoeing, fitness walking, racquetball, martial arts, pilates, weight training and yoga. Aquatics, bowling, and golf courses have additional fees. Permission of department chair is required to enroll in lifeguarding. Maximum credit toward bachelor’s degree is 2.0 hours. Maximum credit toward associate degree is 1.0 hours. C-2PA.