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Academic Program > Major and Minor Fields of Study > Sociology and Social Work

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Sociology and Social Work

Chair Robert B. Pettit, Barbara J. Burdge, Abigail A. Fuller, Cheryl L. Krueckeberg, Bradley L. Yoder

SOCIOLOGY

Sociology is the study of social life. At the interpersonal level, sociology studies the causes and consequences of such things as identity, romantic love and deviance. At the societal level, it examines and explains such things as poverty, crime and racism. At the global level, it studies such things as immigration, modernization and war.

The sociology major and minor are designed to prepare students to continue study in graduate school or to enter career fields such as public policy, human services, research analysis, community organizing or law enforcement, among others.

Undergraduate specialization in sociology is designed with the objectives of either employment after graduation or entry into graduate degree programs.

CRIMINAL JUSTICE
Baccalaureate Degree
Minor in criminal justice, 24 hours: SOC 228, 244, 340; SOWK 110, 274, 275; POSC 121 or 122; PSYC 220 or 325.

Associate of Arts Degree
Major in criminal justice, 27 hours: SOC 101, 228, 244, 340, 345; SOWK 110, 233, 274, 275.

SOCIOLOGY
Baccalaureate Degrees
Major in sociology, sociology concentration, 36 hours: SOC 101, 222, 228, 240, 345, 440; 18 hours of electives in sociology (nine hours at 300 level or above).

Major in sociology, criminal justice concentration, 36 hours: SOC 101, 222, 223, 228, 240, 244, 340, 345, 440; nine hours of electives in sociology.

Majors must successfully complete the senior comprehensive evaluation prior to graduation. Details are available from the department chair.

Minor in sociology, 24 hours: SOC 101, 222, 228, 240, 345; nine hours of electives in sociology (three hours at 300 level or above).

Requirements for teaching majors are available in the Office of Teacher Education.

Courses SOC

101 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY - 3 hours
Sociology as a way of knowing and a body of knowledge. Special attention to socialization, inequality in American society and the institutions of family, religion, politics and economy. Fall. Spring. C-4HS.

220 SOCIAL GERONTOLOGY - 3 hours
An introductory course in the field of aging. Study areas include perspectives on aging, social roles, family, retirement, living environments, minority and cross-cultural experiences, political and economic implications of aging. Also included is a study of the social institutional response to the needs and problems of older adults in the form of policies, programs and services. Prerequisite: SOC 101. Fall. C-3RC.

222 SOCIAL RESEARCH METHODS - 3 hours
The methodological framework for planning and implementing qualitative and quantitative social research, including the process of developing research designs, the selection of samples, the construction and use of research instruments, and methods of analyzing and interpreting data. Ethical issues and the relevance of empirical research for building knowledge and evaluating service delivery in helping professions are considered. Students are encouraged to satisfy the General Education requirement in mathematics before enrolling in the course. Prerequisite: SOC 101. Fall.

223 DEVIANCE AND SOCIAL CONTROL - 3 hours
The study of how societies come to define certain attributes and behaviors as deviations from social norms and how societies attempt to suppress or regulate them. Topics include alcohol and drug use, crime and elite deviance, sexual assault and family violence, mental disorder, homosexuality and prostitution. Prerequisite: SOC 101. Fall, even years.

228 RACIAL, ETHNIC, AND GENDER GROUP RELATIONS - 3 hours
A sociological approach to the dynamics of racial, ethnic and gender group relations using relevant theories, concepts and empirical studies. Patterns of differential power and intergroup conflict in U.S. society will be examined using examples from several groups.

230 ASPECTS OF AMERICAN POPULAR CULTURE - 3 hours
The study of a particular aspect of American popular culture using sociological concepts, theories and methods for the analysis of culture. Topics may include: Disney and American culture, American culture and politics through film, the golden age of radio, and the malling of America. This course may include field trips or off-campus study as appropriate. Course may be repeated once for credit on different topics. Only three hours may be applied toward the major. January.

233 SOCIAL WELFARE AS AN INSTITUTION - 3 hours
An historical and analytical assessment of social welfare as an institution, using a framework of problem/need definition, policy goals, program design and service delivery. Evolution of social welfare and social work in the United States. Functions of social work as a profession in programs concerning income security, family and children’s services, aging, criminal justice, mental health, developmental disabilities, aging and others. The impact of conflicting values, inequality and oppression on social welfare. Prerequisite: SOC 101 or permission of instructor. Fall.

240 SOCIOLOGICAL THEORY - 3 hours
Survey of sociological theories from the classical founders (Marx, Durkheim, Weber, and Simmel) to modern schools of thought (such as functionalism, conflict theory, symbolic interactionism, dramaturgy, ethnomethodology, interpretive theory, feminist theory and postmodernism). Emphasis on enduring theoretical contributions as well as their application to contemporary social issues. Prerequisite: SOC 101. Fall.

244 CRIMINAL BEHAVIOR AND THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM - 3 hours
The study of theories about crime and delinquency, and an overview of all major elements of the criminal justice system. Examination of the use of the criminal sanction in the United States, through major statutory, case and Constitutional law. Prerequisite: SOC 101 or permission of instructor. Fall.

275 PRACTICUM IN SOCIOLOGY - 3 hours
Observation and participation in any of a wide range of human experiences and social systems. May be repeated for a total of six credit hours, three credit hours of which may be used to meet requirements in the major. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. Fall. January. Spring.

305 SELF AND SOCIETY - 3 hours
Social psychology from a sociological perspective, examining the interaction between individual lives and social structure: How humans are created by their social order and how humans create social orders. Major topics include socialization and the development of the self, language and the social construction of reality, and the social construction of gender. Prerequisites: PSYC 101, SOSC 102, or SOC 101. Spring, even years.

311 CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY - 3 hours
Provides a theoretical framework and methods for the study of cultures. Questions related to the unity of humankind and the diversity of human custom are central concerns. Study of several related non-Western cultures enables students to consider the relationship among the individual, culture, and society and encourages them to develop respect for other cultures and a better understanding of their own. C-3GC.

328 SOCIAL MOVEMENTS - 3 hours
Examines the importance of social movements as a force for social change, why social movements emerge and develop, why people join them; strategies and tactics used, and factors influencing success or failure. Focus is on social movements in United States society. Prerequisite: SOC 101 or permission of instructor. Fall, odd years.

333 SEXUALITY AND GENDER IN SOCIETY - 3 hours
Human sexuality as social interaction and a social-cultural construction. Topics include sexuality in historical-cultural context, psychosexual development and socialization, love and sex, sexual attitudes and behaviors, contraception, sexual coercion, and commercial sex, with special emphases on sexual identity, sexual orientation and gender. A focus on empirical knowledge with attention to ethical and affective concerns. Prerequisite: SOC 101 or permission of instructor. Spring.

335 SOCIOLOGY OF FAMILY - 3 hours
Primary emphasis on development and maintenance of intimate relationships in the United States; theoretical and empirical materials on family life cycle, dating, sexual behavior, readiness for marriage, sexual behavior, social change and emerging family styles. Prerequisite: SOC 101 or permission of instructor. Fall, odd years.

340 YOUTH AND THE JUVENILE JUSTICE SYSTEM - 3 hours
Examination of the problem/need-definition process with youth and young offenders, including the ambiguity of social policies and adolescent roles in the United States. Adolescent needs and need-meeting structures. Historic landmarks in juvenile justice, including major movements and court decisions. Elements of current U.S. youth justice systems, and examination of policy and program alternatives for intervention. Prerequisite: SOC 101 or permission of the instructor. Spring.

345 CLASS, STATUS AND POWER - 3 hours
Classical and modern theories of class structure and mobility used to analyze the forms and conditions of social inequality, primarily in U.S. society. Relationships of class position to behavior in family, religion, politics and education are included. Prerequisite: SOC 101 or permission of instructor. Spring.

347 SOCIOLOGY OF RELIGION - 3 hours
Religion from the sociological perspective: theoretical approaches, individual religiosity, social organization of religion, contemporary trends, and religion in interaction with family, politics, economy, class and race. Prerequisite: SOC 101 or permission of instructor. Fall, odd years.

350 HEALTH, MEDICAL CARE AND SOCIETY - 3 hours
An examination of health, illness and medical care from a sociological perspective. Topics include social epidemiology, the social psychology of illness, the recruitment and socialization of health professionals, patient/physician relationships, and the organization of health and medical care. Policy considerations are emphasized and the concerns of women, minorities and the disadvantaged receive special attention. Prerequisites: SOC 101 or permission of instructor and junior standing or above.

372 SOCIOLOGICAL RESEARCH PRACTICUM - 2 hours
Experience in the process of using existing research findings for a better understanding of community problems, client needs, service programs, etc. The student is assigned to a setting where a realistic application of research knowledge is done under the direction of both a setting supervisor and the College instructor. Concurrent with or following SOC 222. Fall. January. Spring.

440 SENIOR SEMINAR (W) - 3 hours
A capstone course for sociology majors to integrate the diverse elements of their coursework into a coherent and mature conception of sociology as an approach to inquiry and to life. Prerequisites: ENG 111; SOC 101, 222, 240. Spring.

380 or 480 SPECIAL PROBLEMS - 1-4 hours
A student who has demonstrated ability to work independently may propose a course and pursue it with a qualified and willing professor. The department chair and the vice president and dean for academic affairs also must approve. A set of guidelines is available at the Office of the Registrar.

385 or 485 SEMINAR - 1-4 hours
An in-depth consideration of a significant scholarly problem or issue. Students pursue a supervised, independent inquiry on an aspect of the topic and exchange results through reports and discussions. January, odd years.

SOCIAL WORK

Director Barbara J. Burdge

This baccalaureate degree program, accredited by the Council on Social Work Education, prepares competent, effective social work professionals who are committed to generalist practice. This includes providing services to the poor and oppressed and working to alleviate poverty, oppression and discrimination. The program seeks to graduate people who understand truth as it is perceived from scientific, moral, philosophical, historical and global perspectives; possess professional generalist social work skills; promote economic and social justice and active peacemaking; and view personal and professional development as a life-long process. The program also prepares students for graduate studies in social work.

Admission into the social work program takes place in two phases: 1) initial admission to major, and 2) admission to the senior social work practice block (SOWK 375, 475, 476 and 477).

  1.

Admission to the major should be completed during the sophomore year and requires:

  1. Regular admission into Manchester College;
  2. Achievement of sophomore status;
  3. Minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale;
  4. Satisfactory completion of SOWK 110 and enrollment in or completion of SOWK 233;
  5. Personal integration and aptitude for generalist social work practice; and
  6. Satisfactory progression toward the program objectives, as evidenced by:
     
  1. personal statement,
  2. one reference from one Manchester College social work faculty,
  3. pertinent work or volunteer experience,
  4. unofficial transcript, and
  5. an admissions interview.
 
  2.

Admission to the senior social work practice block should be completed during the spring semester of the junior year and requires:

  1. Completion of a minimum of 76 credit hours;
  2. Admission to the Social Work Program;
  3. Previous participation in a Celebrating Diversity Workshop;
  4. Demonstration of satisfactory progress (e.g., minimum 2.0 overall GPA, progress toward program objectives); and
  5. Remediation of any areas of concern identified at admission to the social work program, as evidenced by:
     
  1. the personal statement and self-evaluation,
  2. pertinent work or volunteer experience,
  3. unofficial transcript, and
  4. an admissions interview.
 

Applications for admission to the social work major and to the senior social work practice block are available from the social work program director or on the Social Work Program website.

Baccalaureate Degree
Major in social work, 58 hours: BIOL 102 or 204; PSYC 110; one course selected from: ECON 221, 222, 320, 328; one course selected from: POSC 121, 122, 140, 233; SOC 101; SOWK 110, 222, 228, 233, 274, 334, 366, 375, 475, 476, 477.

Academic credit for life experience and previous work experience is not granted, in whole or in part, in lieu of field instruction or of courses in the professional foundation of the social work major.

Majors must successfully complete the senior comprehensive evaluation prior to graduation. Details are available from the social work program director.

Courses SOWK

110 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL SERVICES - 3 hours
Introduction to the helping professions, with particular emphasis on the nature of generalist social work. Content includes professional values and ethics, social problems and inequities, populations-at-risk, and social service delivery philosophies and settings. Social work perspectives, including systems models, strengths perspective, social and economic justice, person-in-environment and evidence-based practice are highlighted. Fall. Spring. C-3RC.

220 SOCIAL GERONTOLOGY
See SOC 220. C-3RC.

222 SOCIAL RESEARCH METHODS
See SOC 222.

228 RACIAL, ETHNIC AND GENDER GROUP RELATIONS
See SOC 228.

233 SOCIAL WELFARE AS AN INSTITUTION
See SOC 233.

244 CRIMINAL BEHAVIOR AND THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM
See SOC 244.

274 PRACTICE METHODS IN SOCIAL SERVICES - 3 hours
Introduces a variety of generalist social work intervention approaches through written work, volunteer service, and experiential learning. Students learn how to apply social work knowledge, skills and values, to micro, mezzo and macro practice situations. Attention given to self awareness, communication, the helping relationship, use of theory, phases of problem solving, ecosystems and strengths perspectives, diversity, advocacy, case management, recordkeeping, team functioning, peacemaking, self care and evaluating effectiveness. Prerequisite: SOWK 110. Fall.

275 PRACTICUM IN HUMAN SERVICES - 1-3 hours
Observation and participation in a human services organization. Focus on exposing students to social service delivery systems and potential roles in human services. May be repeated for a total of six hours. Prerequisite: consent of department chair. Fall. January. Spring.

334 HUMAN BEHAVIOR IN THE SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT (W) - 4 hours
Examination of human development over the life span as the individual participates in families, groups, organizations, and communities. Empirically-supported theories and knowledge are used to understand reciprocal relationships among human biological, psychological, spiritual, social, and cultural systems. Appreciation of diversity is fostered, including understanding the consequences of oppression for “at-risk” populations. Students apply an interdisciplinary knowledge base to the generalist social work assessment process. Prerequisites: BIOL 102 or 204; ECON 221, 222, 320, or 328; POSC 121, 122, 140, or 233; PSYC 110; SOC 101; or permission of instructor.

340 YOUTH AND THE JUVENILE JUSTICE SYSTEM
See SOC 340.

350 POLICY AND PRACTICE ISSUES IN SOCIAL WELFARE - 3 hours
A group study of issues and programs in a selected field of social welfare such as child welfare, rural or industrial social services, drugs and social behavior, or international social welfare. Focus of study and location vary according to faculty resources and student interest. Aspects of need definition, policy goals, program design and service delivery are addressed. May be repeated on different topics with permission.

366 SOCIAL SERVICE POLICY - 3 hours
Application of the social policy/program model introduced in SOWK 233 to domestic and international social welfare policy; impact of values and power on policy development and application in public and private programs; social allocation and integrated service delivery; social planning and other mezzo- and macro-level intervention strategies; analysis of programs with potential to promote social and economic justice. Prerequisites: SOWK 233; ECON 221, 222, 320, or 328; POSC 121, 122, 140 or 233. Fall.

372 SOCIOLOGICAL RESEARCH PRACTICUM - 2 hours
Experience in the process of using existing research findings for a better understanding of community problems, client needs, service programs, etc. The student is assigned to a setting where a realistic application of research knowledge is done under the direction of both a setting supervisor and the College instructor. Concurrent with or following SOC 222. Fall. January. Spring.

375 SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE I - 3 hours
Integration of social work knowledge, values and skills for entry-level generalist practice with diverse individuals, families, groups, organizations and communities. Application of current research and theoretical perspectives to assessment, intervention and evaluation processes. Emphasis on advanced critical thinking, empowerment-based practice, peacemaking and students’ emerging professional identities. Includes retreat and service learning project. Prerequisite: admission to social work program and the senior social work practice block. Fall.

475 FIELD INSTRUCTION - 4 or 6 hours
Observation and participation in a social service setting under supervision of a qualified practitioner. Students carry limited administrative and case load responsibilities congruent with entry-level generalist social work practice and program mission. Total of 10 semester hours (completed consecutively) are required for the major. Prerequisites: admission to the social work program and the senior social work practice block, and completion of SOWK 110, 222, 228, 233, 274, 334, 366, 375. January and Spring.

476 FIELD INSTRUCTION SEMINAR - 4 hours
Weekly group and individual supervision from faculty for analysis and evaluation of field instruction experience. Students complete integrative written projects and presentations on topics related to generalist social work. Includes retreat, extended field trip on urban social issues, workshop on sexual orientation and gender identity. Fees required. Concurrent enrollment with SOWK 475. Spring.

477 SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE II - 3 hours
Integration of the theoretical social work practice models and principles conceptualized during Social Work Practice I, and tested in generalist practice roles during field instruction. Development within each student of a coherent personal practice model based on practice values, validated knowledge and practice skills. Course requires individualized learning objectives developed during retreat that ends field instruction and begins this seminar.

380 or 480 SPECIAL PROBLEMS - 1-4 hours
A student who has demonstrated ability to work independently may propose a course and pursue it with a qualified and willing professor. The department chair and the vice president and dean for academic affairs also must approve. A set of guidelines is available at the Office of the Registrar.

385 or 485 SEMINAR - 1-4 hours
An in-depth consideration of a significant scholarly problem or issue. Students pursue a supervised, independent inquiry on an aspect of the topic and exchange results through reports and discussions.