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Academic Program > Major and Minor Fields of Study > Environmental Studies

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Environmental Studies

Director Jerry E. Sweeten

Baccalaureate Degree

Courses listed in parentheses are prerequisites.


Major in environmental studies, 51-56 hours.

Core, required for all majors; 26 hours: BIOL 106, 106L, 108, 108L, 225, 225L; ECON 115; ENVS 130, 401, 475 or 380/480; INTD 425; POSC 121 or 122.

Natural history concentration, 25-26 hours: core courses plus the following: BIOL 331, 331L, 241, 241L or 243, 243L, 315/315L or 413/413L; ENVS 201; NASC 207/207L or 209; one sequence selected from: CHEM 105, 105L and 106, 106L, or 111, 111L and 113, 113L.

Policy concentration, 27-30 hours: core courses plus the following: one sequence selected from: CHEM 105, 105L and 106, 106L, or 111, 111L and 113, 113L; ECON 303; ENVS 403; MATH 210; POSC 225, 253; one course selected from: POSC 222, (ECON 221; MATH 120 and 210 or 240) ECON 350; (SOC 101) SOC 222. Students in policy concentration are advised to take ECON 303 prior to ENVS 403.

Technical concentration, 27 hours: core courses plus the following: BIOL 315/315L or 413/413L; CHEM 111, 111L, 113, 113L, 235, 235L, 260, 106/106L or 311/311L; MATH 210.

Majors must successfully complete the senior comprehensive evaluation prior to graduation. Details are available from the director of environmental studies.

Minor in environmental studies, 26 hours: BIOL 106, 106L; ENVS 130; one course selected from: CHEM 105/105L, 106/106L, 111/111L; ECON 115; ENVS 401; INTD 425; POSC 121 or 122; three hours of elective credit to be approved by the director of environmental studies.

Course descriptions can be found on the major fields of study pages.

Specialized Environmental Courses

BIOL 225 CONSERVATION BIOLOGY - 2 hours
Definitions and origin of biodiversity, threats to its maintenance, value of preserving variety, ecological and genetic principles relating to preservation, and practical strategies for preservation. Corequisite: BIOL 225L. Spring, alternate years.

BIOL 225L CONSERVATION BIOLOGY LAB - 1 hour
Data collection and hypothesis testing in conservation biology. Corequisite: BIOL 225.

ECON 303 ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS - 3 hours
A study of the economics of environmental and natural resource issues. The natural resource issues will include energy, renewable and nonrenewable resources, and sustainability. The environmental issues will include the analysis of optimal pollution levels, environmental regulations and alternative policies to reduce pollution and global warming. Prerequisites: ECON 115 or ECON 221.

ENVS 130 INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES - 3 hours
Basic concepts of ecosystem theory, culture and environment, application of the scientific method in examining global processes and problems, and proposed solutions to environmental problems. C-4NN

ENVS 201 INTERPRETATION OF NATURAL HISTORY - 3 hours
Survey of geomorphology, ecoregions, flora, fauna, and cultural heritage as they relate to principles of natural history interpretation and fundamentals of site administration and management. Prerequisites: ENG 111; COMM 110.

ENVS 278 PRACTICUM IN ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES - 1-4 hours
Observation of and participation in the activities of a professional in an applied field that is related to the environment. Examples of appropriate mentors include, but are not limited to, foresters, environmental lobbyists, research scientists, environmental consultants, environmental chemists and wildlife biologists. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: Appropriate coursework in disciplines; varies with practicum.

ENVS 380/480 SPECIAL PROBLEMS - 1-4 hours
A student who has demonstrated ability to work independently may propose a course and pursue it with a qualified and willing professor. The department chair and the vice president and dean for academic affairs must also approve. A set of guidelines is available at the Office of the Registrar.

ENVS 401 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE (W) - 3 hours
A study of contemporary issues related to human populations and the ecology of survival. Analysis of the human population explosion, rates of population growth, and the distribution of population. The relation of human populations and the physical environment with a special concern for the effect of pollution on human health and survival and the demands for raw materials by our industrial activities, both in the developed and the developing segments of the world. An integrative senior level course for environmental studies majors and minors. Prerequisite: ENVS 130; ENG 111. Spring, alternate years.

ENVS 403 ENVIRONMENTAL LAW - 3 hours
This course examines the role of environmental regulations and how they affect the conduct of individuals in modern American society.

ENVS 475 INTERNSHIP IN ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES - 3-6 hours
Student interns will function as environmental professionals. Internships involve significantly more independence and decision-making responsibility than do practica. Juniors and seniors majoring in environmental studies only. May not be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: appropriate coursework in disciplines; varies with practicum.

INTD 425 ENVIRONMENTAL PHILOSOPHY - 3 hours
A study of: 1) competing theories of distributive justice and their implications for various environmental issues (land use, famine relief, population control, pollution abatement, etc.), 2) animal liberation and animal rights, 3) the possibility of a land ethic, and 4) the relation between one’s religious beliefs and one’s attitudes towards nature. Spring, even years. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing. C-5CC.

POSC 253 ENVIRONMENTAL POLITICS - 3 hours
An examination of how political forces shape environmental choices and how political processes are used to address and manage environmental problems. The interplay of local, national and international environmental problems and policies will be examined. Fall, even years.

 


 

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