New and Temporary Courses

Manchester University 2014 January & Spring Registration Schedule

Descriptions for new and temporary courses are listed below. See the Manchester Catalog for other course descriptions.

BIOL T24 SCIENCE AND CULTURE IN AUSTRALIA 3 SH
Australia has been isolated from the rest of the world for over 200 million years and has developed unique biota, ecosystems and indigenous culture. Its settlement by people of European origin occurred relatively recently and in an unusual way. This course will focus on the development of a modern, industrial society in the context of Australia’s distinctive geography, environment and recent human history. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or above and one BIOL course. C-3GC

BUS T32 PRINCIPLED LEADERSHIP 3 SH
Students explore leadership in multiple contexts including business, community, and other organizations. Topics include styles and traits of both effective and ineffective leaders along with the role of organizational culture in leadership effectiveness. No previous exposure to studying business is required or expected. C-3RC.

BUS 202 EXPLORING INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS 3SH
Students explore international business in one or more countries outside the United States.  Topics include international marketing, advertising, manufacturing, distribution, tourism, and promotion.  No previous exposure to studying business is required or expected. C-3GC.

BUS 322 SALES FORECASTING 3 SH
Students examine the role of formal statistical techniques in the forecasting of product sales and market demand. Topics include forecasting methods and model selection, forecasting with regression models, forecasting with time-series models, and the evaluation of forecast accuracy. Prerequisites: BUS-234; MATH-210.

BUS 451 SALES AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP 3 SH
Students explore the intersection between the sales function and the small business start-up and the differences between selling an established product or service and selling in the start-up context.  Topics include selling to multiple audiences (e.g., investors, customers, government) and moving others to believe in the entrepreneur and in her or his vision for the future. Prerequisite: BUS 309.

BUS 453 SALES MANAGEMENT 3 SH
Students explore sales technology along with the responsibilities of sales executives and field sales managers. Topics include CRM; time and territory management; sales presentations; and sales force design, recruiting, training, motivation, compensation, and evaluation. Prerequisite: BUS 309

COMM T34 RHETORIC OF GENDER 3 SH
Rather than examining how gender influences communication, this course will explore how communication creates and reifies existing concepts of gender in personal and public discourse.  Through the systematic analysis of media artifacts, the course aims to problematize gendered constructs and explore the ideological underpinnings of gendered representations. Students will learn methods of rhetorical criticism and use these methods as a systematic framework for analyzing symbolic artifacts. In particular, students will learn Cluster Criticism, Fantasy Theme Criticism, Ideological Criticism, and Feminist Criticism methods.

COMM 344 LISTENING: A RELATIONAL APPROACH TO SALES 3 SH
This course will explore the appropriate attitudes and relevant listening principles needed to develop effective sales relationships. Because effective listening skills and empathy have a positive effect on sales performance and buyer satisfaction, students will develop proficiency in the interrelated listening processes of hearing, understanding, remembering, interpreting, evaluating, and responding.

Developing an ethics of listening, students will consider important choices that must be made each time they communicate with others. Students will learn in theory and practice that effective and appropriate communication begins with listening: competent communicators work harder to understand than to be understood.

CPTR 111 FOUNDATIONS OF COMPUTER SCIENCE I 4 SH
As a first course in Computer Science, the emphasis will be on problem solving. Students will learn to solve problems by the iterative refinement of object oriented models. Topics include simple Unified Modeling Language (UML) class diagrams, technical writing, design principles and programming using interacting classes, one dimensional arrays, program flow control, and simple I/O. An object-oriented language that supports encapsulation, polymorphism, and inheritance will be used. Prerequisite: MATH-105 or higher mathematics placement.

CPTR 113 FOUNDATIONS OF COMPUTER SCIENCE II 3 SH
A continuation of Foundations of Computer Science I, the emphasis will be on formalizing and extending student knowledge of analysis, design, technical writing, and implementation. Topics include reusability and change tolerance, interface design, coupling, cohesion, polymorphism, inheritance, information hiding, good programming practices, and fundamentals of algorithm/data structure design. Prerequisite: CPTR-111

ESS 311 INTERNATIONAL SPORT GOVERNANCE 3 SH
Ireland & the U.K offer wonderful academic and experiential opportunities for students to visit and study the European model of sport. The origins of many of the world's most popular sports today lay in the codification of traditional British games. This class will take students inside the European model of club sports where they will receive firsthand experience at various facilities, clubs, universities and other sporting organizations and businesses. Prior completion of ESS 306 preferred.

ESS 313 INTERNATIONAL SPORTS MEDICINE 3 SH
This international study abroad course travels to Ireland & the U.K and offers fantastic opportunities for students to visit and study the European model of sports medicine. These specific regions have unique medical professionals, health care, and sports medicine teams to compare and contrast to that of the US.  Students will explore the country sides, history, and culture of these two countries. This course will take students inside the European Model of Health Care and Sports Medicine where they will receive firsthand experience and knowledge at various facilities, clubs, universities and other sporting events. Prior completion of ESS 251 and 253 is preferred.

INTD T33 COMPUTERS ADN CULTURE 3 SH
This course will examine the relationship between computer technology and culture: how the one informs the other, what role the producers and consumers of technology play as agents of culture, and the effect of pervasive technology on society's progress and ethics. Areas that will be critically analyzed include intellectual property, online identity, freedom of speech, and privacy. These issues will be considered primarily in the historical context of American culture, along with variations that appear in other cultures. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing. C-5CC.

INTD T49 ANARCHIST ENCOUNTERS 3 SH
This course explores the nature of anarchism past and present. Students will first sample notable works of anarchist political theory, and then, examine how anarchist activists have contributed to fields such as education, religion, urban planning, ecology, economics, identity, and the arts. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing. C-5CC

INTD 421 QUEEN ELIZABETH I 3SH
This course focuses on the life and influence of Elizabeth I, the self-proclaimed “Virgin Queen” who ruled England from 1558-1603.  Throughout the semester, we will examine Elizabeth’s powerful roles in key political, religious, and cultural events (including the Spanish Armada, the ongoing establishment of the Church of England, and the literary “renaissance”).  We will read texts from a variety of genres – sonnets and epic poetry, drama and masques, political tracts, sermons, speeches, private letters, and diaries – and also study the visual representation of the monarch in progresses, court celebrations, and official portraits.  The end of the course will move beyond the context of Tudor England to American and British pop culture; ultimately, we will consider why Elizabeth remains a fascinating figure for critics, royal watchers, and filmmakers more than four centuries after her death. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing.  C-5CC.

LIB 210 BURNED & BANNED: CENSORED CHILDREN'S LITERATURE 3 SH
Censorship in public schools is an ongoing and challenging issue. What constitutes “appropriate” reading material? Who decides what is and is not “appropriate?” How do values and morals impact such decisions? The goal of the course will be to explore and analyze a variety of child and adolescent literature which has been historically banned, the nature for such decisions, and the implications of those decisions historically, socially, culturally, and politically. Censorship will be examined, analyzed, and evaluated from multiple perspectives, and in the process of this exploration, class members will clarify our own values about the role of literature in shaping youth. C-4LT.

MATH T24 CONTEST PROBLEM SOLVING 1 SH
Supervised preparation for and participation in intercollegiate mathematics competitions.  A variety of mathematical problem-solving strategies will be presented and applied to contest-level problems. Participation in at least one competition is required. May be repeated to a maximum of four hours. Prerequisite: MATH-122 or concurrent enrollment. P/NP

 

Additional Information

2014 Summer Schedule

2014 Fall Semester Schedule

2015 January Session Courses and Travel

2015 Spring Semester Schedule

New & Temporary Course Descriptions

Registration Policies

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