Manchester University Academic Catalog 2018-2019

History and Political Science

Chair Benson C. Onyeji, Mark Angelos, Uma Ganesan, David F. McFadden, Michael Staudenmaier, Leonard A. Williams

The Department of History and Political Science encourages all students to explore the historical roots and contemporary forms of the world’s cultures, institutions and practices. Our programs are rooted in such liberal arts traditions as intellectual integrity, multidisciplinary interests and civic education. Our alumni are well prepared for graduate or professional studies in a number of fields, as well as for careers in education, government, law or business. The department is especially proud of its long-standing commitment to helping our students develop an international awareness and an appreciation for cultural diversity.

History is the study and interpretation of the human past. It emphasizes the interrelation of culture, social structure, economic conditions and political institutions. Through the study of history, students gain an understanding and appreciation of diverse points of view and insights into ways of life and perspectives different from their own. Students taking courses in the field will learn about historical events, trends and causation. They will learn to use a variety of research skills and analytical categories in explicating and interpreting the past.

Political science focuses on the systematic study of collective decision-making and the interactions between power and interest in human affairs. Students of political science explore such topics as the institutional and socio-economic bases of political behavior; the cultures, institutions and processes of contemporary political systems; the relations between and among nations; and the world’s major political philosophies. Through the study of political science, students learn the theories and research methods necessary for analyzing and understanding political life.

HISTORY
Major in history, 35 hours: HIST 104 or 121; HIST 105 or 123; HIST 113, 114, 344; 18 hours of electives at the 200-level or above. These must include 9 hours at the 300-level or above, and must include at least one course in American (3 hours); European (3 hours); Asia/World (3 hours).

Majors must successfully complete the senior comprehensive evaluation prior to graduation. Details are available from the department chair.

Minor in history, 22 hours: HIST 113 or 114; HIST 104 or 121; HIST 105 or 123; 12 hours of electives at the 200 level or above. Must include at least 3 hours of 300 level or above.

History Teaching Major: Requirements available in the Office of Teacher Education.

top2

Courses HIST

104 INTRODUCTION TO EUROPEAN HISTORY: ANCIENT TO 1500 - 3 hours
A survey of the development of European society and western civilization from the ancient era through the early modern Renaissance. C-4HH.

105 INTRODUCTION TO EUROPEAN HISTORY: 1500 TO PRESENT - 3 hours
A survey of the development of European society and western civilization from the Protestant Reformation up to the present era. C-4HH.

113 AMERICAN HISTORY: COLONIAL PERIOD TO 1865 - 3 hours
The evolution of American social and political institutions, the development of government under the constitution and the political, social and economic movements that culminated in the Civil War. C-4HH. Fall.

114 AMERICAN HISTORY: 1865 TO THE PRESENT - 3 hours
A continuation of HIST 111. The rise of the industrial state, the emergence of the United States as a world power, and social trends and reform movements. C-4HH. Spring.

121 WORLD HISTORY TO 1500 - 3 hours
This course examines the emergence and development of political and social institutions in the world from ancient times to 1500, from a comparative perspective. It will examine the various ways in which societies have sought to legitimate political authority, how they have grappled with religious and philosophical questions and how social classes and hierarchies have developed over time. The interconnectedness of world regions will be emphasized by examining the movement of people and the exchange of goods and ideas. C-4HH.

123 WORLD HISTORY FROM 1500 - 3 hours
This course examines the development of political and social institutions in the world from 1500 to the present, from a comparative perspective. It will examine the various ways in which societies have sought to legitimate political authority, how they have grappled with religious and philosophical questions and how social classes and hierarchies have developed over time. The interconnectedness of world regions will be emphasized by examining the movement of people and the exchange of goods and ideas. C-4HH.

201 MEDIEVAL EUROPE - 3 hours
A survey of European economic, social and political development from the late Roman period through the later Middle Ages. C-4HH.

202 RENAISSANCE AND REFORMATION EUROPE - 3 hours
A survey of European economic, social and political development beginning in the late medieval period and including study of the Renaissance, the Protestant Reformation and the subsequent wars of religion. C-4HH.

203 EARLY MODERN EUROPE - 3 hours
A survey of European economic, social and political development from the post-Reformation wars of religion up to the age of revolution, including study of the Enlightenment, the French Revolution and early industrialization. C-4HH

204 MODERN EUROPE - 3 hours
A survey of European economic, social and political development from the Industrial Revolution up to the present era. C-4HH

205 ANCIENT EUROPE - 3 hours
A survey of European political, social and economic development during the Greek and Roman eras, including study of Celtic and Germanic culture and society. C-4HH.

210 MODERN CHINA AND EAST ASIA: 1750 TO THE PRESENT - 3 hours
This course surveys the history of China and East Asia from c. 1750 CE to the present through a focus on the forces, both internal and external, that propelled China to a major revolution in the twentieth century, followed by an examination of the People’s Republic of China from the Mao years through to the Deng-Xiaoping era and after. Concurrently, the course broadly surveys the history of modern Japan from the Meiji Restoration in the late nineteenth century to its rise as an imperial power culminating in its aggressive role in World War II and its aftermath. The course thus provides a framework for understanding contemporary East Asia. C-3GC.

226 IMPERIALISM AND THE MODERN WORLD - 3 hours
This course examines imperialism and its corollaries of colonialism, empire and nationalism of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries as major shaping forces of the modern world. It also examines the factors that accelerated the process of decolonization in Asia and Africa after 1945 and considers the state of imperialism, colonialism and empire since. C-3GC.

227 RACE AND ETHNICITY IN AMERICAN HISTORY - 4 hours
A survey of the experience of various racial and ethnic groups in colonial, 19th and twentieth century America. It will offer the opportunity to explore the ways in which American society has reacted to “outside” groups, and to explore how these groups have seen themselves and shaped their own interaction with American society and culture. C-3RC.

234 HISTORY OF FOODWAYS - 3 hours
An exploration of the history of diet, cooking methods, and foods in the Americas from the 16th century through the 20th century. The contributions to American foodways of Native Americans, African Americans, and other ethnic groups will be emphasized in addition to studying changes in cooking technology and ideas about proper nutrition. The class will include hands-on food preparation sessions. Fee required. January.

236 ASPECTS OF AMERICAN SOCIAL HISTORY - 3 hours
The study of a particular aspect of American social history. This is a variable topics course that will feature offerings that focus on the life experiences of specific groups of Americans over certain periods of time. These groups will be defined by factors such as age, race, ethnicity, kinship, gender, class, ideology and/or geographic location. Topics could include such things as: The African American Experience in Indiana, American Families in the 19th and 20th Centuries, Small Town and Rural Life in the 19th and 20th Century United States, Youth in 1920s (or 1960s) America, or Life in the Urban Industrial Cities of the Midwest. This course may be repeated once for credit if on a different topic. C-3RC.

240 ORAL HISTORY TECHNIQUES - 1-3 hours
A survey of the methodological issues, techniques and applications of oral history. Students will learn the steps necessary to prepare an oral history project, including background research, interviewing techniques and transcription. They also will learn about preservation, cataloging procedures and the legal and ethical issues involved in doing oral history.

242 SOUTH AND SOUTHEAST ASIA: ANCIENT TO 1500 - 3 hours
This course primarily surveys the history of South Asia from c.1500 BCE to the advent of the Mughal Empire in the mid-1500s CE through a focus on: the Indus Valley civilization, Hinduism’s role in the evolving socio-political structures, the emergence of centralized empires, early religious reform efforts in the form of Buddhism and Jainism and the advent of Islamic kingdoms in the region. Secondarily, the course broadly surveys the history of Southeast Asia from c. 300 BCE to 1500 CE with an emphasis on the early kingdoms in the region and the evolution of the economy and religious beliefs during this period. C-3GC.

244 TOPICS IN CHINESE HISTORY - 3 hours
This course will focus on the history of a specific period or topic in Chinese history. Topics could include: Ancient China, Late imperial China (1368-1912) and Modern China: From Imperial Rule to the People’s Republic. Themes addressed in the course include: the emergence and evolution of social and political institutions, class, and gender. Course may be repeated once for credit on a different topic. C-3GC.

246 SOUTH AND SOUTHEAST ASIA: 1500 TO PRESENT - 3 hours
This course primarily surveys the history of South Asia from c.1500 CE to the present through a focus on: the Mughal Empire, European expansion into South Asia, the establishment of the British Raj, the development of nationalism, the establishment of the modern nation-states of India, Pakistan and Bangladesh and major developments of the last 60 years in the region. Secondarily, the course broadly surveys the history of Southeast Asia from c. 1500 CE to the present with an emphasis on the region’s interactions with the outside world, particularly the West, the spread of colonialism, the development of nationalist resistance to it, the establishment of modern nation-states in the region and the political challenges facing the nations of Southeast Asia today. C-3GC.

250 HISTORY OF THE HOLOCAUST - 3 hours
This class will explore the events surrounding the Holocaust. We will study the motives the Nazi regime had in their murderous campaign for a new world order, the reactions of the victims, decisions of bystanders, and the role of religion, psychology and politics in the history of the Holocaust. The effect of the Holocaust on the concept of justice will also be discussed. C-3RC.

252 COMPARATIVE CIVILIZATION - 3 hours
An examination of the history of various civilizations of the globe through visits, readings and discussions which focus on areas under study. The course is always an off-campus offering. May be repeated on different topics. C-3GC. January.

263 THE MAKING OF INDIA AND PAKISTAN - 3 hours
This course examines a seminal event of the twentieth century – the partition of the Indian subcontinent at the end of British rule in 1947 into India and Pakistan – an event that rivals the Holocaust in the horrors it unleashed. It engages with the Partition through historians’ writings as well as through film and literature. The course also explores the legacies of Partition for both the relationship between India and Pakistan and international politics. C-3GC

270 TOPICS IN HISTORY THROUGH VISUAL MEDIA - 3 hours
Popular perceptions of the past are often shaped by visual media: films, videos, documentaries, and other forms of modern electronic entertainment and information. This course will examine and analyze selected topics in history by comparing how they appear in visual presentation with evidence gleaned from readings, lectures and discussions. May be repeated on different topics. January.

315 BRITISH HISTORY - 3 hours
A broad survey of the political, social and constitutional history of the British Isles. Particular emphasis will be placed on relations between England, Wales, Scotland and Ireland. Prerequisite: HIST 104 or 105 or 121 or 123.

318 ITALIAN HISTORY - 3 hours
An examination of historical developments on the Italian peninsula. This course will examine a wide variety of social, political, economic and cultural developments demonstrating the significance of Italy to Western society. Prerequisite: HIST 104 or 105 or 121 or 123.

329 WOMEN IN AMERICAN HISTORY - 3 hours
A survey of the experience of various groups of women in colonial, 19th and 20th century America. The nature of family life and the technology and management of the household will be ongoing themes. Specific topics of relevance also will be pursued, including women’s roles in religious life of the colonial period, development of women’s rights and suffrage in the 19th century and the impact of women’s increasing participation in the paid labor force.

337 WOMEN, GENDER STUDIES, AND EUROPEAN HISTORY - 3 hours
This course explores the historical development of European culture and society through the perspective of women’s and gender issues from ancient times to the modern era. Prerequisite: 104 or 105 or 121 or 123.

341 HISTORY OF AMERICAN THOUGHT AND POPULAR CULTURE IN THE 19TH CENTURY - 3 hours
An exploration of three or four different themes that were important in defining ways of thinking and cultural life in the United States during the 19th century. The course will focus on how these ideas were understood and expressed in both the intellectual and the popular culture of the period. Prerequisite: HIST 111 or HIST 112

342 HISTORY OF AMERICAN THOUGHT AND POPULAR CULTURE IN THE 20TH CENTURY - 3 hours
An exploration of three or four different themes that were important in defining ways of thinking and cultural life in the United States during the 20th century. The course will focus on how these ideas were understood and expressed in both the intellectual and the popular culture of the period. Prerequisite: HIST 112

344 HISTORIOGRAPHY AND RESEARCH METHODOLOGY (W) - 3 hours
This course will focus on the techniques and methods used in the historical profession. In addition to the study of historiography, students also will begin the process of researching and writing a paper based on primary source materials. Prerequisite: junior standing. Fall.

353 WOMEN, GENDER, AND SOCIAL REFORM IN INDIA AND CHINA - 3 hours
This course examines the theme of women, gender, and social reform in India and China from c. 1800 to 1950 CE from a historical perspective. Students will engage with the major events, ideas and processes that have shaped the modern histories of these nations, especially the debate surrounding women's status in India and China. The course complicates assumptions of a general category of 'women' by emphasizing the differing experiences both between women in India and women in China and among women within India and China. It also considers debates and trends within women's history to examine issues related to re-writing the past from a gendered perspective. Prerequisite: HIST 121 or HIST 123.

460 RECENT AMERICAN HISTORY - 3 hours
An examination of social, political, economic and intellectual forces that have shaped American thought and policy since World War II.

475 INTERNSHIP - 3-12 hours
Student interns will work in the historical field under the supervision of a professional historian. Internships will generally involve work in public history. No more than three hours may be used to meet requirements in the major. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor and department chair.

499 SENIOR THESIS - 1 hour
Supervised research in primary source materials culminating in a paper, which will satisfy the requirements of the Senior Comprehensive Evaluation. Prerequisite: HIST 344.

380 or 480 SPECIAL PROBLEMS - 1-4 hours
A student who has demonstrated ability to work independently may propose a course and pursue it with a qualified and willing professor. The department chair and college dean also must approve.  A set of  guidelines is available at the Office of the Registrar.

385 or 485 SEMINAR - 1-4 hours
An in-depth consideration of a significant scholarly problem or issue. Students pursue a supervised, independent inquiry on an aspect of the topic and exchange results through reports and discussions.

POLITICAL SCIENCE

Baccalaureate Degree
Major in political science, 36-37 hours: POSC 121, 140, 201, 233, 325; POSC 236 or 237; POSC 321 or 322; one course selected from: POSC 225, 311, 344; one course selected from: POSC 360, 365, 367; nine hours of electives in political science.

Majors must successfully complete the senior comprehensive evaluation prior to graduation. Details are available from the department chair.

Minor in international studies, 24 hours: POSC 131, 140; one course selected from: ECON 221, ECON 222, INTD 320, INTD 425, INTD 427, INTD 441; one course selected from: PEAC 110, PEAC 33, POSC 360, POSC 365, POSC 367; one course selected from: ART 348, COMM 256, COMM 362, ENVS 130, FREN 111, FREN 112, HIST 204, HIST 210, HIST 226, HIST 242, HIST 246, HIST 250, HIST 263, MUS 119, POSC 236, POSC 237, REL 222, REL 223, SPAN 111, SPAN 112, SOC 311; three semester hours of course work taken through a short-term, semester, or year-long study abroad program; students will demonstrate intermediate or higher proficiency in a language other than their native language. This requirement may be waived for students who complete a significant and appropriate international experience without acquiring intermediate language proficiency.

Minor in political science, 24-25 hours: POSC 121, 140, 201, 233; POSC 236 or 237; POSC 321 or 322; one course selected from: POSC 225, 311, 344; one course selected from: POSC 360, 365, 367.

top2

Courses POSC

121 American National Politics - 3 hours
An introductory study of national government, emphasizing contemporary structures and processes and their influence on public policy. C-4HP.

122 STATE AND LOCAL POLITICS - 3 hours
An introductory study of state and local government, emphasizing contemporary structures and processes and their influence on public policy. C-4HP.

131 INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES - 3 hours
This course surveys the emerging global visions in international studies and the issues we face in our increasingly interdependent world.  Topics include issues in international politics, international economics, globalization, history, environment and cultural studies. C-3RC.

140 INTERNATIONAL POLITICS - 3 hours
An introductory survey of theories of state behavior and analysis of political and related forces that operate in the international system, including nationalism, ideology and economic interest. C-4HP. Fall.

201 POLITICAL CONCEPTS AND IDEOLOGIES - 3 hours
A discussion of important concepts (such as liberty, equality and democracy) set in the context of contemporary issues and modern ideologies (such as liberalism, conservatism and socialism). C-3RC.

225 PUBLIC POLICY - 3 hours
An overview of the policy-making process, the methods and theories of policy analysis and contemporary policy issues and controversies. Prerequisite: POSC 121 or POSC 122. Spring, even years.

233 COMPARATIVE POLITICS - 3 hours
Comparative analysis of selected national political and economic systems, emphasizing distinctive political cultures, institutions, practices, organizations and decision-making processes. C-4HP. Spring.

236 COMPARATIVE FOREIGN POLICY - 3 hours
A survey of foreign policy of both developed and developing countries. The issues studied include non-military concerns such as financial policy, communication technology, human rights, environmental problems, international trade, transnational crime and terrorism. C-3GC.

237 AFRICAN POLITICS - 3 hours
This course explores the various aspects of contemporary politics in Africa. It seeks to understand why Africa is lagging behind in world affairs, and what appropriate strategies or policies should Africa pursue in its quest for development. The main objective of this course is to examine the causes and prospects for sustainable development in Africa following centuries of slavery and colonialism. C-3GC.

274 TOPICS IN AMERICAN POLITICS - 3 hours
An investigation into a particular topic related to politics and government in the United States. Possible topics: civic skills, election campaigns, voting behavior, political parties, interest groups, law and the courts, liberalism and conservatism, justice. May be repeated on different topics.

311 SUPREME COURT AND THE CONSTITUTION - 4 hours
An introduction to the Supreme Court and to constitutional law in the United States. The course will provide students with a framework for understanding major controversies in such areas as civil liberties, civil rights and criminal procedure. Prerequisite: POSC 121. Fall, odd years.

321 ANCIENT AND MEDIEVAL POLITICAL THOUGHT - 3 hours
Analysis of the political thought of significant ancient and medieval theorists. Exploration of such topics as human nature, justice, the state, obligation, freedom, equality, the common good and the nature of political thinking. Fall, even years.

322 MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY POLITICAL THOUGHT - 3 hours
Analysis of the political thought of significant modern and contemporary theorists. Exploration of such topics as human nature, justice, the state, obligation, freedom, equality, the common good and the nature of political thinking. Spring, odd years.

325 POLITICAL ANALYSIS (W) - 3 hours
Introduction to the use and interpretation of the statistical techniques commonly used in political science. Students will also learn how to present the results of an empirical investigation in a research paper. Prerequisite: FYS or ENG 111. Fall, odd years.

344 CONGRESS AND THE PRESIDENCY - 3 hours
A study of the political dynamics within and between two primary governmental institutions in the United States. Prerequisite: POSC 121. Spring, even years.

360 INTERNATIONAL LAW - 3 hours
A survey of the development of the rules and principles of international law, and their present applications in world politics. Emphasis upon the contributions of international institutions in fostering political and economic change, managing social conflicts and strengthening states and the state system. Prerequisite: POSC 140. Spring, even years.

365 INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY - 3 hours
Examination of the basic concepts, mechanisms and concerns of international political economy. Particular attention is given to how the state and market systems operate and interact. Prerequisite: POSC 140. Spring, odd years.

367 INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATION - 3 hours
A study of international organizations. Emphasis upon the United Nations and its peacemaking, peacekeeping, and peace-enforcing roles, as well as its contributions to world order. Prerequisite: POSC 140. Fall, even years.

370 MODEL UNITED NATIONS - 1-2 hours
Supervised preparation for and participation in Model United Nations sessions. May be repeated to a maximum of four hours. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

372 MOCK TRIAL - 2 hours
Supervised preparation for and participation in intercollegiate mock trial tournaments. May be repeated to a maximum of four hours. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

475 INTERNSHIP - 3-12 hours
Long-term or extensive participation in formal internships with governmental or non-governmental organizations. No more than three hours may be used to meet requirements in the major. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor and department chair.

380 or 480 SPECIAL PROBLEMS - 1-4 hours
A student who has demonstrated ability to work independently may propose a course and pursue it with a qualified and willing professor. The department chair and the college dean must also approv e. A set of the guidelines is available at the Office of the Registrar.

385 or 485 SEMINAR - 1-4 hours
An in-depth consideration of a significant scholarly problem or issue. Students pursue a supervised, independent inquiry on an aspect of the topic and exchange results through reports and discussions.

Back to top