Manchester University Academic Catalog 2018-2019

Modern Languages

Chair Scott DeVries, Tara Smithson, Shane L. Thomson, Carlos A. Yañez

The Department of Modern Languages prepares student to (a) communicate effectively in the target language, (b) read and analyze literature from across time and around the world and (c) understand and appreciate the culture of countries in which the target language is spoken. Students in our majors and minors undertake graduate study or employment in a variety of fields that include linguistics, law, teaching, medicine and business. Many of our graduates have received prestigious awards such as the Fulbright and Rotary fellowships.

The Modern Languages Department offers the following majors and minors:

French: major and minor
German: minor
Spanish: major and minor
Modern Languages: major
TESOL: minor

Students who major in a modern language spend at least one semester living and studying abroad, usually in the sophomore or junior year. All language majors must complete a senior comprehensive evaluation to verify they have attained (a) advanced-low or better written and oral proficiency according to ACTFL standards, and (b) substantial knowledge of the relevant literatures and cultures. Majors must also take the senior capstone seminar that focuses on research skills, literary analysis and the culture, history and politics of a specific time period.

Language Placement Information
Students who have completed two or more years of a language in high school must (1) take the department’s placement examination during the new student orientation period, or (2) submit scores from a national standardized test such as the Educational Testing Service’s Advanced Placement (AP) or the College Level Examination Program (CLEP) examination. The student will then be placed at the appropriate level. Students who place into the intermediate level of a language will not receive credit for the elementary level.

Students can receive credit for the intermediate level (six semester hours)

  1. by completing the 201/202 sequence at Manchester University,
  2. by placing into the advanced level (300) of a language and receiving a grade of C or higher in this coursework,
  3. by passing a proficiency examination with a grade of B or higher, in addition to the language placement test, or
  4. by forwarding Advanced Placement scores to Manchester University. Students who receive a score of 4 on the AP test will receive nine semester hours of credit for intermediate and advanced language courses; scores of 5 will be awarded twelve semester hours for intermediate and advanced courses.
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FRENCH
Baccalaureate Degree (Bachelor of Arts only)
Major in French, 36 hours: FREN 201, 202; MODL 485; nine hours selected from FREN 301, 302, 305, 325; nine hours selected from FREN 301, 302, 305, 325, or other French culture and civilization courses; six hours in French literature (FREN 315 or other approved courses); twelve hours of electives in French language, culture and civilization, and French literature. Courses must be listed in the Catalog or must be approved by the Department of Modern Languages.

Minor in French, 24 hours: FREN 201, 202; nine hours selected from FREN 301, 302, 305, 325, electives in French culture and civilization approved by the Department of Modern Languages; FREN 315; six hours in electives in advanced French language, culture and civilization and French literature. These courses must be listed in the Catalog or must be approved by the Department of Modern Languages.

Teaching Major or Minor in French:
Requirements available in the Office of Teacher Education.

Manchester University students of French are encouraged to study for a semester or a year in France, preferably during their junior year. Students with two years of college French or the equivalent proficiency are eligible. Manchester University grants credit for satisfactory work done abroad through accredited programs. Study abroad is expected for those wishing to complete a major in French. Interested students should discuss the possibility of foreign study with the academic advisor as soon as possible.

Courses FREN

110 INSIDE FRANCE - 3 hours
Introduction to the history, culture and daily life of France. Background reading, slide presentations and lectures will give students a basic sense of the major periods of French history, the outstanding intellectual and artistic movements which shape formal French culture and the distinctive features of French daily life. Much of the time in France will be devoted to activities that illustrate, extend and synthesize the background material. Assignments designed to develop understanding of daily life will require some elementary French. Prerequisite: FREN 111. C-3GC. January.

111  FOOD CULTURES - 3 hours   
An introduction to the French language through the food cultures of French-speaking countries. The course emphasizes listening and speaking skills through task-based activities oriented around the purchase, preparing, serving, and eating of cuisine in Francophone cultures. Class is conducted in French as much as possible. C-3GC.

112  MEMORY AND CULTURE - 3 hours
Exploration of cultural perspectives in the French-speaking world related to memorable experiences and events. Students develop French language skills to communicate about cultural and personal experiences and to express recollections of these experiences. Course is oriented toward task-based activities to communicate ideas about identity, convictions, and culture and conducted in French as much as possible. C-3GC.

201    COMMUNICATION AND CULTURE - 3 hours
Exploration of cultural currents and effective communication of ideas in order to broaden and solidify language and intercultural skills. Course features conversation oriented toward cultural competence, reading comprehension of various texts, and language laboratory work geared toward improved proficiency. Class is conducted primarily in French. Prerequisite: Placement via examination in French. C-3GC.

202  CULTURE AND CONTROVERSIES - 3 hours
Development of skills in the expression of convictions regarding cultural controversies in areas such as science, technology, media, politics, social culture, etc. in order to strengthen language and intercultural skills. The class emphasizes effective communication in French to articulate ideas and beliefs about identity, current events, and cultural values. Class is conducted primarily in French. Prerequisite: Placement via examination in French. C-3GC

 301  ORAL COMMUNICATION - 3 hours
Intensive practice in spoken expression via discussion of written texts, art, films, and contemporary issues.  Course work is oriented toward improvement of students’ oral proficiency through presentation, class-wide discussion, and individualized assessment. Course taught in French. C-3GC

302  IDEAS AND CULTURE - 3 hours
Practice of oral and written communication in formal and informal settings using the French language. Students will discuss and analyze several cultural topics through the use of authentic French-language sources for class discussions, research, debate and oral presentations. Course taught in French. C-3GC.

315  FRANCOPHONE FILM, LITERATURE, AND CULTURE - 3 hours
Introduction to the critical study of Francophone film, literature, and culture. Course materials will include important examples from the history of French and Francophone canons of literature, film, and other cultural texts. Increased proficiency in oral and written communication is emphasized. C-4LT

325 GLOBAL ENGAGEMENT - 3 hours
An intensive language course that prepares students to identify and discuss global issues in the target language as informed individuals. Content and themes are drawn from multiple sources, including newspapers, magazines, journals, television and Internet. This course is taught entirely in the target language. Prerequisite: one 300 or 400-level course in French.

330 FRENCH CIVILIZATION AND HISTORY - 3 hours
This course provides an in-depth consideration of the history and cultural traditions (intellectual, artistic, political, social) of France.  This course is taught entirely in French and includes attention to skills and content necessary for articulate self-expression in French.  Prerequisite: FREN 202 or equivalent proficiency.

401 FRENCH DRAMA (W) - 3 hours
Selected plays by French dramatists from the seventeenth through the twentieth centuries, including works by such playwrights as Racine, Moliere, Marivaux, Beaumarchais, Hugo, Musset, Sartre, Ionesco and Beckett. Activities include lectures, class discussion, critical composition, and oral and written explication de texte. Prerequisite: FREN 301.

413 FRENCH FICTION (W) - 3 hours
Selected narrative verse, novels and short stories by French and/or Francophone authors from the Middle Ages to the present. Because the content changes from year to year, the course may be repeated once. Activities include lectures, class discussion, critical composition and oral and written explication de texte. Prerequisite: FREN 301.

423 MODERN FRENCH POETRY (W) - 3 hours
Important French poets and poetic movements of the 19th and 20th centuries, including such writers as Hugo, Baudelaire, Verlaine, Mallarmé, Valéry, Apollinaire, Prévert, Ponge and selected Francophone poets. Activities include lectures, class discussion, versification and scansion, critical composition and oral and written explication de texte. Prerequisite: FREN 301.

380 or 480 SPECIAL PROBLEMS - 1-4 hours
A student who has demonstrated ability to work independently may propose a course and pursue it with a qualified and willing professor. The department chair and college dean also must approve.  A set of guidelines is available at the Office of the Registrar.

385 or 485 SEMINAR - 1-4 hours
An in-depth consideration of a significant scholarly problem or issue. Students pursue a supervised, independent inquiry on an aspect of the topic and exchange results through reports and discussions.

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GERMAN

Minor in German, 24 hours: GER 201, 202; MODL 485; nine hours selected from electives in German language and culture approved by the Department of Modern Languages; three hours of German literature; three hours in electives in advanced German language, culture and civilization, and German literature. These courses must be listed in the Catalog or must be approved by the Department of Modern Languages.

Manchester University students of German are encouraged to study for a semester or a year in Germany. Students with two years of college German or the equivalent proficiency are eligible. Manchester University grants credit for satisfactory work done abroad through accredited programs. Interested students should discuss the possibility of foreign study with the academic advisor as soon as possible.

Courses GER

111  IDENTITY AND CULTURE - 3 hours
Exploration of personal and public identities in German-speaking countries. This course emphasizes developing listening and speaking skills through task-based activities that focus on family, food, fashion, interests and hobbies, daily living, etc. Class is conducted in German as much as possible. C-3GC.

112   COMMUNITY AND CULTURE - 3 hours
Exploration of community life in German-speaking countries. This course emphasizes developing listening and speaking skills through task-based activities that focus on local and regional geography, transportation, festivals and holidays, religion, industry, etc. Class is conducted in German as much as possible. C-3GC

201   CULTURES IN CONTACT - 3 hours
Exploration of the internal and external histories of German-speaking countries. This course emphasizes broadening and solidifying language and intercultural skills through task-based activities that focus on social and political institutions, art, literature, media, science, technology, etc. Class is conducted primarily in German. Prerequisite: Placement via examination in German. C-3GC.

202    CRISES AND CONTROVERSIES
Exploration of crises and controversies that affect the global community, particularly from the perspective of German-speaking countries. This course emphasizes broadening and solidifying language and intercultural skills through task-based activities that focus on the environment, immigration, security, poverty, conflict, etc. Class is conducted primarily in German. Prerequisite: Placement via examination in German. C-3GC.

301, 302 ADVANCED GERMAN I, II - 6 hours
Introduction to more complex linguistic structures and to German culture and civilization. Increased proficiency in oral and written communication is emphasized. Class is conducted exclusively in German. Prerequisite: GER 202 or placement via examination. Fall, even years (301). Spring, odd years (302).

315 INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY ANALYSIS - 3 hours
Introduction to the critical study of literature. Readings will include selections from a variety of German authors. Increased proficiency in oral and written communication is emphasized. Prerequisite: GER 202 or placement via examination.

380 or 480 SPECIAL PROBLEMS - 1-4 hours
A student who has demonstrated ability to work independently may propose a course and pursue it with a qualified and willing professor. The department chair and college dean also must approve.  A set of  guidelines is available at the Office of the Registrar.

385 or 485 SEMINAR - 1-4 hours
An in-depth consideration of a significant scholarly problem or issue. Students pursue a supervised, independent inquiry on an aspect of the topic and exchange results through reports and discussions.

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SPANISH
Baccalaureate Degree (Bachelor of Arts only)
Major in Spanish, 36 hours: SPAN 201, 202; MODL 485; nine hours of courses selected from: SPAN 301, 302, electives in Spanish culture and civilization approved by the Department of Modern Languages; two literature courses from SPAN 315, 403, 413, 385/485; twelve hours from SPAN 230, 301, 302, 321, 325, 330, 333, 340, 380, 385, 403, 413, 480, 485. These courses must be listed in the Catalog or must be approved by the Department of Modern Languages.

Minor in Spanish, 24 hours: SPAN 201, 202; one literature course from SPAN 315, 403, 413, 385/485; fifteen hours of electives from SPAN 230, 301, 302, 321, 325, 330, 333, 340, 380, 385, 403, 413, 480, 485.  These courses must be listed in the Catalog or must be approved by the Department of Modern Languages.

Teaching Major or Minor in Spanish: 
Requirements available in the Office of Teacher Education.

Manchester University students of Spanish are encouraged to study for a semester or a year in a Spanish-speaking country, preferably during their sophomore or junior year. Students with two years of college Spanish or the equivalent proficiency are eligible. Manchester University grants credit for satisfactory work done abroad through accredited programs. Study abroad is required for those wishing to complete a major in Spanish. Interested students should discuss the possibility of foreign study with the academic advisor as soon as possible.

Courses SPAN
 
111  FOOD CULTURES - 3 hours
An introduction to the Spanish language through the food cultures of Spanish-speaking countries. The course emphasizes listening and speaking skills through task-based activities oriented around the purchase, preparing, serving, and eating of Spanish and Latin American cuisine. Class is conducted in Spanish as much as possible. C-3GC

112 MEMORY AND CULTURE - 3 hours
Exploration of cultural perspectives in the Spanish-speaking world related to memorable experiences and events. Students develop Spanish language skills to be able to communicate about cultural and personal experiences and to express recollections of these experiences. Course is oriented toward task-based activities to communicate ideas about identity, convictions, and culture. C-3GC.

201 COMMUNICATION AND CULTURE - 3 hours
Exploration of cultural currents and effective communication of ideas in order to broaden and solidify language and intercultural skills. Course features conversation oriented toward cultural competence, study of brief literary works, film, and other texts and language laboratory work geared toward improved proficiency. Class is conducted primarily in Spanish. Prerequisite: Placement via examination in Spanish. C-3GC.

202   CULTURES AND CONTROVERSIES - 3 hours
Development of skills in the expression of convictions regarding cultural controversies in areas such as science, technology, media, politics, social culture, etc. in order to strengthen language and intercultural skills. The class emphasizes effective communication in Spanish to articulate ideas and beliefs about identity, current events, and cultural values. Class is conducted primarily in Spanish. Prerequisite: Placement via examination in Spanish. C-3GC

203 MEDIA AND CULTURE - 3 hours        
Analysis of social, cultural and political currents and their portrayal in modern Spanish-language media. Films, online media, television broadcasts, and other manifestations of visual culture as well as a variety of written texts and other cultural artifacts are explored in order to broaden and solidify Spanish language proficiency and intercultural skills. C-3GC

230  LIVING THE SPANISH LANGUAGE - 3 hours
This intensive course introduces students to a wider understanding of language, culture, and history in Spanish-speaking countries. All classes, excursions, talks and other activities will be conducted in Spanish. Much of the time will be devoted to activities that help the students to understand, broaden and value cultural manifestations and historical development. Course may be taken up to two times for credit. Credit for this course will apply toward the Spanish major or minor. C-3GC. January. Summer.

301 ORAL COMMUNICATION - 3 hours
Intensive practice in spoken expression via discussion of written texts, art, films, and contemporary issues. Course work is oriented toward improvement of students’ oral proficiency through presentation, class-wide discussion, and individualized assessment. Course taught in Spanish. Course may be taken twice for credit under different syllabi.

302 IDEAS AND CULTURE - 3 hours
Practice of oral and written communication in formal and informal settings using the Spanish language. Students will discuss and analyze several cultural topics through the use of authentic Spanish-language sources for class discussions, research, debate and oral presentations. Course taught in Spanish. Course may be taken up to two times for credit under different syllabi. C-3GC

315 INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY ANALYSIS - 3 hours
Introduction to the critical study of literature. Readings will include selections from a variety of Spanish and Latin American authors. Increased proficiency in oral and written communication is emphasized. Prerequisite: SPAN 301 or 302. C-4LT.

321 HISORY AND LINGUISTICS OF SPANISH - 3 hours
A history of the Spanish language, its phonetics, phonology, morphology and syntax. The course also focuses on regional variations as well as the Spanish spoken in the United States. This class is taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 302.

325 GLOBAL ENGAGEMENT - 3 hours
An intensive language course that prepares students to identify and discuss global issues in the target language as informed individuals. Content and themes are drawn from multiple sources, including newspapers, magazines, journals, television and Internet. This course is taught entirely in the target language. Course may be taken up to two times for credit under different syllabi.

330 CULTURES AND CIVILIZATIONS IN SPAIN - 3 hours
This course provides an in-depth consideration of the culture, history, art, film and architecture of Spain. The course is taught entirely in Spanish and may be taken up to two times for credit under different syllabi.

333 INTENSIVE STUDIES IN SPANISH - 3 hours
A combination of research and onsite exposure to language and culture. The course is designed for students seeking Spanish credit for participating in an off-campus travel course. Enrollment in this course replaces the student’s enrollment in the non-language course. May be repeated for credit; a maximum of 6 hours may be used towards the Spanish major or minor. All work is done in Spanish. Prerequisite: permission of the travel course professor and permission of the Department of Modern Languages.

340      HISPANIC-AMERICAN CULTURE AND CIVILIZATION - 3 hours
This advanced course provides an in-depth consideration of colonial societies and cultures of Spanish-speaking countries in America. This course is taught entirely in Spanish. Course may be taken up to two times for credit under different syllabi.

385       SEMINAR - 3 hours
An in-depth consideration of a significant scholarly problem or issue. Students pursue a supervised, independent inquiry on an aspect of the topic and exchange results through reports and discussions. Course may be taken up to two times for credit under different syllabi.

403 SURVEY OF LATIN AMERICAN LITERATURE - 3 hours
A chronological study of the poetry, drama and fiction of Latin America from the Discovery (1492) to the boom of the 60s and 70s. Activities include lectures, oral reports, class discussions and a term paper. Prerequisite: SPAN 315.

413 SURVEY OF SPANISH LITERATURE - 3 hours
A chronological study of the poetry, drama and fiction of Spain from the Medieval Period (1140) to the post-war period (1970). Activities include lectures, oral reports, class discussions and a term paper. Prerequisite: SPAN 315.

380 or 480 SPECIAL PROBLEMS - 1-4 hours
A student who has demonstrated ability to work independently may propose a course and pursue it with a qualified and willing professor. The department chair and college dean also must approve.  A set of guidelines is available at the Office of the Registrar.

485   SEMINAR
An in-depth consideration of a significant scholarly problem or issue. Students pursue a supervised, independent inquiry on an aspect of the topic and exchange results through reports and discussions. Course may be taken up to two times for credit under different syllabi.

MODERN LANGUAGES

Major in modern languages, 36 hours: MODL 385; Intermediate-high language proficiency in one language: 24 hrs of coursework at the 200-level or higher (FREN/GER/SPAN 201, 202, 301, 302, and courses in language, literature, culture). Novice-High proficiency in a second language (200-level): 6 hours. Three hours of elective course chosen in consultation with MODL department chair. One semester study abroad at a Spanish, French or German speaking site.

TESOL

Minor in teaching English to speakers of other languages, 24 hours: ENG/MODL 350, 352, 354; ENG 310 or 311; six hours intermediate French, German or Spanish; one 300 or 400-level course in French, German or Spanish*; one course chosen from COMM 256; ENG 238, 310 or 311 (not used to meet above requirements);FREN 110; HIST 227; MODL 241 or 411; SOC 228; SPAN 230.

*International students will be exempt from the language courses if their native language is not English. Students who have completed one semester of study abroad may substitute (upon approval of the program coordinator) an appropriate course from their study abroad if their non-English academic experience is substantial.

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Courses MODL

201 EUROPEAN LITERATURE - 3 hours
Study and comparison of works of European literature within the framework of a period in literary history, of a literary genre or of dominant themes and motifs. C-4LT.

225 LEGENDS REVISITED - 3 hours
Students will analyze works from classical and medieval legend (especially epic and romance) and will compare and contrast them with reworkings from later periods. Students will acquire basic information about the genres that convey legend and the historical contexts of specific legends; they will develop skills in literary analysis, especially techniques necessary to compare, contrast and evaluate early occurrences of archetypes and themes along with their counterparts in literature of more recent date. Syllabus will include material from Greek and Roman mythology (Oedipus, the Trojan war, Aeneas and Dido) as well as medieval legend (El Cid, the Nibelungenlied, King Arthur, Charlemagne). All works taught in English. C-4LT.

231 PRE-HISPANIC MESOAMERICAN/ADEAN CULTURES - 3 hours
This course provides an introduction to the history of Pre-Columbian America. It will focus on the developmental stages, cultural achievements, cultural diversity and characteristics of the most salient Mesoamerican and the Andean civilizations, before the arrival of the Europeans. It will also focus on the cross-cultural interactions between indigenous and European populations. C-3GC.

241 US LATINO LITERATURE AND CULTURE - 3 hours
An investigation of US Latino culture through artistic texts. Students will read a variety of literary genres and explore the contributions of US Latinos to art, music, television and film. Along the way, students will consider the particular challenges for this unique and diverse group of Americans and examine the stereotypes that exist about Latinos in US culture today. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing. C-4LT.

350 TEACHING ENGLISH TO SPEAKERS OF OTHER LANGUAGES - 3 hours
Instruction and practice in the theory, techniques, and skills of teaching English to speakers of other languages, Observing ESL and foreign language classes, tutoring international students, diagnosing language acquisition problems, planning lessons and curricula, evaluating ESL texts and doing related research. Fall. Prerequisite: ENG 310 or ENG 311 or a modern language course at the 300 level.

352 PRACTICUM IN TEACHING ENGLISH TO SPEAKERS OF OTHER LANGUAGES - 3 hours
Supervised experience in teaching English to speakers of other languages. Students will apply the theories and techniques of second-language acquisition which were covered in the prerequisite course. Practicum may be done anywhere in the world. Prerequisite: ENG 350.

354 SECOND-LANGUAGE ACQUISITION - 3 hours
Course explores how people learn language and what methodologies respond to different linguistic needs and learning styles. Topics include: theories of language learning, diagnosis of language learning problems, assessment techniques, pedagogies appropriate to second language acquisition, relationship of culture to language development. Prerequisite: intermediate proficiency in a second language.

375 PRACTICUM IN LANGUAGE AND CULTURE - 3-6 hours
This course allows students to gain practical experience related to their language studies while they are enrolled in off-campus language-related courses. A maximum of three hours may be used toward a departmental major or minor. May not be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: One 300-level language course.

411 INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY TRANSLATION - 3 hours
A seminar that serves as introduction to the history, theory and practice of literary translation into English. Students will become familiar with various theories of translation and learn to implement them in their own translations. Students will produce a readable translation that reflects the language, meaning and purpose of the original. Students must have knowledge of literary analysis and the ability to read and write well in both the source and target languages. Prerequisites: A minimum of two courses (one in literature) at the 300-level or higher, in the source language.

475 PRACTICUM IN LANGUAGE PEDAGOGY - 3 hours
Students with advanced status (junior/senior) in language will gain practical experience in how to plan language curriculum, develop language activities, and evaluate learning in a university classroom setting. May not be repeated for credit.  Prerequisite: Major or minor in language, ENG/MODL 354.

485 SEMINAR (W) - 1-4 hours
An in-depth consideration of a significant scholarly problem or topic. Students pursue a supervised, independent inquiry and exchange results through reports and discussions. Course is taught in English, but students complete written work in the language of their major. Prerequisite: senior standing.

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