Manchester University Academic Catalog 2018-2019

Philosophy and Religious Studies

Chair Steve S. Naragon, Kathryn S. Eisenbise Crell, Katharine L. Gray Brown, Jonathan Krull, Justin M. Lasser, Seth M. Mayer

PHILOSOPHY

The philosophy program studies questions of being, knowledge, action and the good, as well as examining conceptual frameworks and practices of other disciplines such as religion, art, psychology and the natural sciences. Students will develop strong oral, written and analytical skills in creating and critiquing arguments while exploring the major philosophical traditions; they will articulate a philosophical understanding of their own; and they will work through some of the most basic questions concerning human existence.

Baccalaureate Degree
Major in philosophy — philosophical traditions concentration, 33 hours: PHIL 201, 215, 230, 316, 330; two courses selected from: PHIL 318, 320, 423; one course selected from: REL 222 or 223; nine hours of electives from departmental courses and with departmental approval.

Major in philosophy — ethics, politics, and law concentration, 33 hours: PHIL 201, 215, 219, 230, 235, 316; one course selected from: PHIL 444, INTD 423, 425; one course selected from: PHIL 318, 320, 423, POSC 321, 322; two courses selected from the following and in consultation with the department: ACCT 241, BUS 313, 365, COMM 360, ECON 328, ENVS 403, HIST 226, INTD 324, 345, 427, 441, PEAC 330, POSC 140, 201, 225, 311, 360, 365, REL 205, SOC/SOWK 228, 233, 244, SOC 240, 262, SOWK 366; three hours of electives approved by the department chair.

Minor in philosophy, 21 hours selected from departmental courses and with departmental approval.

Courses PHIL

201 INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY - 3 hours
An introduction to the philosophical tasks of (a) reflective thinking about life and the universe as a totality; (b) critical examination of presuppositions, words and concepts; (c) examination of ways in which we gain knowledge; (d) the quest for criteria which determine our value judgments of the good and the beautiful. C-4PH. Fall. Spring.

215 ETHICAL DECISION MAKING - 3 hours
A study of ethical principles and their application to practical decision making in such areas as sex, criminal justice, economics and euthanasia. C-4PH. Fall. Spring.

219 BUSINESS ETHICS - 3 hours
A study of ethical principles and theories in the context of business and the economy. C-4PH.

230 LOGIC - 3 hours
A study of various deductive logics (categorical, propositional and predicate), inductive logics and common informal fallacies. The aim of this study is to improve abilities: (1) to identify arguments from other kinds of discourse and separate what is relevant to an argument from what is not, (2) to evaluate arguments in a reasoned and constructive way, and (3) to construct your own arguments, such that they are clearly stated and free of fallacies.

235 BIOETHICS - 3 hours
A study of ethical principles and theories in the context of current controversies in health care such as: genetic engineering, abortion, euthanasia, reproductive technology and access to health care. C-4PH.

316 ANCIENT AND MEDIEVAL WESTERN PHILOSOPHY (W) - 3 hours
A study of Western philosophy from the Presocratics to William of Ockham. Prerequisite: PHIL 201. Fall, odd years.

318 17TH AND 18TH CENTURY WESTERN PHILOSOPHY - 3 hours
A study of Western philosophy from Hobbes and Descartes to Kant. Prerequisite: PHIL 201. Spring, even years.

320 19TH CENTURY WESTERN PHILOSOPHY - 3 hours
A study of Western philosophy from the German Idealists to Kierkegaard and Nietzsche. Prerequisite: PHIL 201. Fall, even years.

330 PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION - 3 hours
A philosophic approach to the problems of religion with emphasis on ways of knowing, religious language, the theistic hypotheses, basic conceptions of God, the nature and destiny of humanity and the problems of freedom and evil. C-4PH.

423 20TH CENTURY WESTERN PHILOSOPHY - 3 hours
A study of Western philosophy from C.S. Peirce to Sartre and Quine. Prerequisite: PHIL 201. Spring, odd years.

427 PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE - 3 hours
A critical analysis of the sciences and their methods that explores why – and to what extent – the sciences provide knowledge about reality. Topics include the demarcation of science from nonscience, inductive inference, the nature and justification of scientific theories, realism versus anti-realism, scientific change and revolution, comparison between natural and social sciences and the relationship between the sciences and other methods of human inquiry. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing.

444 PHILOSOPHY OF CIVILIZATION (W) - 3 hours
The ideas of philosophers, historians, and political analysts as to how society may best be ordered, what causes the development and breakdown of civilization and the highest ideals on which human life may be built. The nature of historical analysis and the role of the individual, both as thinker and actor in historical development. Prerequisite: FYS or ENG 111. Fall.

380 or 480 SPECIAL PROBLEMS - 1-4 hours
A student who has demonstrated ability to work independently may propose a course and pursue it with a qualified and willing professor. The department chair and college dean also must approve.  A set of guidelines is available at the Office of the Registrar.

385 or 485 SEMINAR - 1-4 hours
An in-depth consideration of a significant scholarly problem or issue. Students pursue a supervised, independent inquiry on an aspect of the topic and exchange results through reports and discussions.

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RELIGIOUS STUDIES

The academic study of religion is a scholarly discipline involving historical, critical, analytic and constructive methodologies to understand religious phenomena, including texts, beliefs, doctrines, practices and world views. It provides excellent background and thinking skills for various academic pursuits, career goals and community leadership.

This department aims to help students gain the following skills: (a) acquire a sympathetic and critical understanding of the Bible and other sacred texts, the Christian faith, and other world religions, (b) articulate and reflect upon the core claims that distinguish the Christian tradition, (c) become acquainted with the major methodologies and issues in the study of religion, (d) prepare for graduate study and (e) understand a world in which compassion reveals the divine.

Baccalaureate Degree

Major in religious studies, international/global concentration, 36-39 hours: REL 101, 102, 120, 131, 205, 210, 222, 223, 435; INTD 341; six hours of electives chosen from: COMM 256; ENG 250; HIST 255; INTD 441; PEAC 330; POSC 131, (POSC 140) 367; REL 316.

Major in religious studies, politics/law concentration, 33-39 hours: REL 101, 102, 120, 205, 435; INTD 341, 345; fifteen hours of electives chosen from: COMM 221, 415; INTD 441; PEAC 330; PHIL 230, 311; POSC 140, (POSC 121 or 122) 225, 311, 322, 360; (SOC 101) SOC 262.

Major in religious studies, psychology of religion concentration, 36-48 hours: REL 101, 102, 120, 435; INTD 341, 345; PSYC 235, 385 (Psyc of Religion); ten hours of electives chosen from: PSYC 201, (PSYC 110) 224, 225, 357; (SOC 101) SOC 347.

Major in religious studies, religion and society concentration, 36 hours: INTD 341; REL 101, 102, 120, 225, 435; SOC 347; 15 hours selected from the following courses: REL 131, 205, 210, 222; SOC 228, 305 (SOC 101), 311, 328, 333, 335, 345.

Major in religious studies, social justice concentration, 36-39 hours: REL 101, 102, 120, 205, 325, 435; INTD 341; fifteen hours of electives chosen from: COMM 415; HIST 225; IDIV 221; INTD 425; PEAC 235, 330; PHIL 444; SOC 228, (SOC 101) 345.

Major in religious studies, individualized concentration, 36 hours: REL 101, 102, 120, 435; INTD 341; twenty-one hours of electives approved by department chair.

Majors must successfully complete the senior comprehensive evaluation. Details are available from the department chair.

Minor in religion, 21 hours: twenty-one hours from religion courses and with departmental approval.

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Courses REL

101 INTRODUCTION TO THE HEBREW BIBLE - 3 hours
A survey of the literature, history and religion of ancient Israel using selected portions of the historical and prophetic books of the Hebrew Bible as primary sources. Includes an introduction to the methods and results of modern biblical scholarship. C-4RL. Fall.

102 INTRODUCTION TO THE NEW TESTAMENT - 3 hours
A survey of the literature, history and religious faith of first century Christianity using the New Testament as a primary source. Includes an introduction to the methods and results of modern biblical scholarship. C-4RL. Spring

111 CHRISTIAN TRADITIONS - 3 hours
Introductory explorations of how Christians throughout their history and across different cultures have understood and practiced their faith in response to the life and teachings of Jesus and the challenges of human existence. C-4RL.

120 INTRODUCTION TO RELIGIOUS STUDIES - 3 hours
An introduction to the academic study of religion, exploring the ways Christianity and other religious traditions confront some of the largest questions and dilemmas of human existence. C-4RL. Fall. Spring.

131 THE JEWISH FAITH, CULTURE AND PEOPLE - 3 hours
A broad introduction to Jewish religious beliefs, festivals, calendar, art, music and literature. C-3GC.

205 RELIGIONS AND WAR - 3 hours
An examination of the role of religion as a factor influencing social and political conflict. Theoretical principles are applied to contemporary cases in which religion functions as a cause and/or mediating force in occurrences of war. January.

210 JUDAISM, CHRISTIANITY AND ISLAM - 3 hours
Study of the origins, development and interaction of Judaism, Christianity and Islam, including contemporary relationships among these faiths. C-4RL.

222 RELIGIONS OF EAST ASIA - 3 hours
Key historical developments in the civilizations of East and Southeast Asia, stressing broad cultural and religious themes, along with political and philosophical perspectives, including the variations in forms of Buddhist life, the pluralistic and non-disjunctive thought patterns of Taoist naturalism and the new divergent social and religious movements of nationalism. C-3GC.

223 RELIGIONS OF INDIA - 3 hours
A study of the ancient roots and contemporary forms of the religions and philosophies native to India such as Vedanta, Hinduism, early Buddhism, Jainism and Sikhism, including their interactions with religions of foreign origin such as Islam and Christianity. C-3GC.

325 FEMINIST AND WOMANIST THEOLOGIES - 3 hours
An exploration of the critique and vision brought to contemporary theology by women’s perspectives represented in texts by feminist and womanist theologians and in women’s fiction and essays. Prerequisite: one course in religion.

228 THE BRETHREN HERITAGE - 3 hours
A critical study of the history, practice and teaching of the Brethren in relationship to major social and intellectual currents and to other religious movements, including both those Christian groups that profess a creed and those which identify themselves primarily in a non-creedal fashion. C-4RL.

241 JESUS AND THE GOSPELS - 3 hours
A study of the ministry and significance of Jesus as portrayed in the New Testament gospels. Some or all of the gospels will be examined and compared. C-4RL.

266 RELIGIOUS CLASSICS - 3 hours
A study of outstanding classics of faith from many areas. Seeks critical appreciation of the ideas, faith stances and aesthetic qualities of the works studied. C-4LT.

311 ANCIENT AND MEDIEVAL CHRISTIANITY - 3 hours
The encounter of Christianity with the classical, Islamic, and barbarian worlds from the first to the 14th century, dealing with sectarianism, heresy, creedal orthodoxy and Catholicism.

312 REFORMATION TO VATICAN II - 3 hours
Study of the relationship of Christianity to major cultural and intellectual movements from the Renaissance and Reformation through the early 20th Century.

435 CONTEMPORARY CHRISTIAN THOUGHT (W) - 3 hours
A study of Christian theology from 1968 to the present, including movements such as liberation theologies, feminist/womanist theologies, process theology, eco-theology, etc.

475 INTERNSHIP IN MINISTRY - 1-3 hours
Supervised ministry with a mentor that includes an examination of ministry techniques and an applied academic project. Students must submit a proposal for study that includes a description of the duties to be performed, the area of study to be pursued, an explanation of the applied project and a rationale for how the project enhances the understanding of the area of study. Students and faculty will work together to implement a plan for evaluation of the project as well as the number of semester hours to be earned. Prerequisite: Permission of Department Chair.

380 or 480 SPECIAL PROBLEMS - 1-4 hours
A student who has demonstrated ability to work independently may propose a course and pursue it with a qualified and willing professor. The department chair and college dean also must approve.  A set of guidelines is available at the Office of the Registrar.

385 or 485 SEMINAR - 1-4 hours
An in-depth consideration of a significant scholarly problem or issue. Students pursue a supervised, independent inquiry on an aspect of the topic and exchange results through reports and discussions.

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