Academics

Schedule of Classes

     

Click here to view the 2017January Session or 2017 Spring Semester Schedules of Classes. The schedule can also be viewed using Search for Sections on ChetAdvisor.

Students not planning to return for the spring semester must complete the formal Exit Interview and Withdrawal procedures through the Success Center (260-982-5242).

Descriptions for new and temporary courses are listed below. See the 2016-2017 Manchester Undergraduate Catalog for other course descriptions.

ART 230 INTRODUCTION TO VISUAL ART - 3 hours
An overview of artistic media, genres, and stylistic periods of western art, beginning with pre-renaissance icons through contemporary art. Students will identify definitive characteristics of examples from each period and use those characteristics to guide classification and analysis of other art. C-4AR.

BUS 117 PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES IN SPORT MANAGEMENT - 3 hours (formerly ESS 105)
Students examine the relationships, goals, and missions that are relevant in gaining a general understanding of the sport industry. Topics include the history and evolution of sport management, current trends in the profession, career options and professional development, and an introduction into the major areas of the field.

BUS 243 SPORT INFORMATION PRACTICES - 3 hours (formerly ESS 202)
Students investigate the fundamentals of communicating in a sports environment. Topics include sports information utilizing various media, effective public relations, and statistical methods and record keeping.

BUS 241 SOCIAL AND ETHICAL ISSUES IN SPORT MANAGEMENT - 3 hours
Students examine the psychosocial and ethical factors involved in effective sport management. Topics include leadership, team dynamics, ethical dilemmas and decision making, international sport governance, and the intersection between sport management and various social institutions.

BUS 363 MARKETING AND SPONSORSHIP IN SPORT - 3 hours (formerly ESS 306)
Students examine principles of marketing and sponsorship related to the sport and fitness industry including professional sports, corporate fitness, college/high school athletics, clubs, and resorts. Topics include sport consumer behavior, market segmentation, applying marketing mix concepts, creating marketing plans, and creating sponsorship packages. Prerequisite: BUS 111

BUS 365 SPORT LAW - 3 hours (formerly ESS 309)
Students examine the legal concepts related to sport and physical activity. Topics include participation and eligibility issues, constitutional due process, Title IX and related administrative law, facility and employment contracts, and tort law applications to participants and spectators. Prerequisite: BUS-111

BUS 367 SPORT FOR DEVELOPMENT - 3 hours
Students examine how sport can be used as a catalyst for development and social change. Topics include the sociocultural impact of sport, sport as an intervention tool, grassroots and global programs using sport as a social change agent, ethical and environmental practices in sport management, and effective program development.

BUS 369 EVENT AND FACILITY MANAGEMENT - 3 hours (formerly ESS 310)
Students examine the multi-faceted nature of event and facility planning, organizing, and management. Topics include strategic planning in event and facility development, financing and revenue generation, event and facility operations, and evaluation. Prior completion of BUS 363 preferred. Prerequisite: BUS-117.

BUS 371 INTERNATIONAL SPORT GOVERNANCE - 3 hours (formerly ESS 311)
Students examine international issues in sport governance and business. Topics include the interaction between sport and culture, various practices in event and facility management, and an international understanding of the sports industry.  This is a travel course that will be taught outside the United States. C-3GC.

BUS 425 STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT AND GOVERNING POLICY IN SPORT - 3 hours
Students examine strategic management issues in the sport business industry. Topics include sport governance, policy development, effective organizational leadership and decision making, corporate social responsibility, and organizational change. Prerequisite: BUS-117, 363.

BUS T32 PRINCIPLED LEADERSHIP - 3 hours
Students explore leadership in multiple contexts including business, community, and other organizations.  Topics include styles and traits of both effective and ineffective leaders along with the role of organizational culture in leadership effectiveness.  No previous exposure to studying business is required or expected. C-3RC.

COMM T32 CRISIS COMMUNICATION - 3 hours
This course investigates theory and research on crisis communication. Students will examine case studies of strategies and tactics of organizations that have dealt with crises. The course aims to provide students with the principles and procedures for handling crisis situations within organizations. Prerequisite: COMM 260

CPTR T11 MOBILE APP DEVELOPMENT - 3 hours
Students will learn the basics of the mobile environment, mobile development tools and basic programming concepts needed to create their own mobile Apps. The history and social/ethical impacts of mobile computing will also be addressed. This course assumes no previous programming experience.

ECON T22 GROWTH & SUSTAINABILITY - 3 hours
This course will investigate how economic growth/development in developing economies can affect environmental sustainability and how better public policy design can help to achieve sustainable economic growth. C-3GC. January.

HIST 2XX TOPICS IN HISTORY THROUGH VISUAL MEDIA - 3 hours
Popular perceptions of the past are often shaped by visual media: films, videos, documentaries, and other forms of modern electronic entertainment and information.  This course will examine and analyze selected topics in history by comparing how they appear in visual presentation with evidence gleaned from readings, lectures, and discussions.  May be repeated on different topics. January.

HIST 242 SOUTH AND SOUTHEAST ASIA: ANCIENT TO 1500 - 3 hours
This course primarily surveys the history of South Asia from c.1500 BCE to the advent of the Mughal Empire in the mid-1500s CE through a focus on: the Indus Valley civilization, Hinduism’s role in the evolving socio-political structures, the emergence of centralized empires, early religious reform efforts in the form of Buddhism, and Jainism, and the advent of Islamic kingdoms in the region.  Secondarily, the course broadly surveys the history of Southeast Asia from c. 300 BCE to 1500 CE with an emphasis on the early kingdoms in the region and the evolution of the economy and religious beliefs during this period. C-3GC. 

HIST 246 SOUTH AND SOUTHEAST ASIA: 1500 TO PRESENT - 3 hours
This course primarily surveys the history of South Asia from c.1500 CE to the present through a focus on: the Mughal Empire, European expansion into South Asia, the establishment of the British Raj, the development of nationalism, the establishment of the modern nation-states of India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh, and major developments of the last 60 years in the region. Secondarily, the course broadly surveys the history of Southeast Asia from c. 1500 CE to the present with an emphasis on the region’s interactions with the outside world, particularly the West, the spread of colonialism, the development of nationalist resistance to it, the establishment of modern nation-states in the region, and the political challenges facing the nations of Southeast Asia today.  C-3GC.

HIST 263 THE MAKING OF INDIA AND PAKISTAN - 3 hours
This course examines a seminal event of the twentieth century – the partition of the Indian subcontinent at the end of British rule in 1947 into India and Pakistan – an event that rivals the Holocaust in the horrors it unleashed. It engages with the Partition through historians’ writings as well as through film and literature. The course also explores the legacies of Partition for both the relationship between India and Pakistan and international politics. C-3GC

IDIV T12 GRE PREPARATION - 0.5 hour
This course is intended for juniors and seniors who intend to take the general GRE (Graduate Record Examination) as part of their application to graduate school.  The goal of the course is to provide preparation and practice, and topics will include general test-taking strategies, specific GRE strategies, GRE math review, and suggestions for studying vocabulary.  This course is useful to students in any major, but may only be taken once for credit. P/NP.

INTD T35 EMOTION IN THE WORKPLACE - 3 hours
This course explores the different ways emotion is constructed through communication and interaction, and how emotional norms are perpetuated and naturalized through employee talk and organizational structures. Students engage in meaningful discussions and learn strategies for dealing communicatively with emotion in the workplace. Micro-practices including emotional labor, social support, compassion, and empathy are emphasized.  Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing. C-5CC.

INTD 427 INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S RIGHTS - 3 hours 
This course examines the place of women and their rights in the debate on universalism vs. cultural relativism.  It analyzes this debate and its consequences for women through a focus on practices such as female genital cutting, sati, honor killings, female infanticide, and others. The course will also consider the prospects that feminist intervention in the debate holds for safeguarding women’s rights as it attempts to transcend the limitations of both universalism and cultural relativism. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing. C-5CC.

MATH 108 NUMBER SENSE FOR ELEMENTARY TEACHERS - 2 hours 
An in-depth treatment of concepts underlying common topics in the elementary mathematics curriculum including: number theory and representation, operations and their properties, functions, and algebraic thinking. Use of selected concrete manipulatives and technology is included. Prerequisite: MATH 105 or high placement.

MATH 242 DATA ANALYTICS - 3 hours
A survey of quantitative techniques and computing tools used to identify patterns in massively large data sets.  Such patterns are used to categorize behavioral trends and customize organizational responses, either toward specific target audiences or on an individualized basis.  Applications will include areas such as:  on-line behavior, social media usage, purchasing preferences, voting patterns, athletic performance, and health outcomes. Prerequisite: MATH-115, 210 or 240, or PSYC-241.

MATH T24 CONTEST PROBLEM SOLVING - 1 hour
Supervised preparation for and participation in intercollegiate mathematics competitions.  A variety of mathematical problem-solving strategies will be presented and applied to contest-level problems. Participation in at least one competition is required. May be repeated to a maximum of four hours. Prerequisite: MATH-122 or concurrent enrollment. P/NP

MATH T2X MATHEMATICS IN CULTURE - 3 hours
This course examines the development of some aspect of mathematics at a certain place during a certain time period.  The course emphasizes how the history, geography, technology, and culture in that location and time influenced the mathematics that was developed and how the mathematics influenced those aspects of society.  Students will explore these topics while visiting the location under study. The place and era will vary.  This course is designed for a general audience and may not be used for credit in the mathematics major or minor. Prerequisite: MATH 105 or higher placement. C-3GC.

MODL T11 ELEMENTARY AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE I - 3 hours
An introduction to American Sign Language and the Deaf community.  Includes common signs, fingerspelling, basic conversational skills, and cultural considerations related to the Deaf community; instruction supplemented by language laboratory practice.

MODL T12 ELEMENTARY AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE II - 3 hours 
Emphasis on conversational ASL and increasing fluency and vocabulary. Receptive and expressive skills are stressed. Introduces ASL grammar and multi-meaning words by comparing ASL with spoken English. Instruction supplemented by language laboratory practice.  Explores social, educational, and vocational issues in the Deaf community. Prerequisite: MODL T11.