MU
Oak Leaves

September 30, 2016

 

Mark Angelos Serves as Interim Director of MU Honors Program


Shelby Harrell

Professor Mark Angelos, professor of history and political science, is the new interim director of the Honors Program at Manchester University.
 
Angelos agreed to fill the position for the 2016–2017 school year because the previous director, Rachel Polando, is on sabbatical. As the interim director, Angelos oversees the current students in the Honors Program as well as encourages first years and upperclassmen with a 3.5 grade point average or higher to apply. “We recruit students who are strong achievers that seek to enhance their college experience,” Angelos said. 
Within the program, students can either enroll in established honors courses or convert regular courses to Honors sections suited for them. In addition, individuals who are not currently members of the Honors Program can petition to be eligible for Honors courses. “I encourage every student who has the grade point average to consider it,” Angelos said. “It adds to your college experience and transcripts.”

When Angelos is not inspiring the young minds of the future from his vantage point as a professor, he serves to inform interested students of the structure of the program. “I’m the go-to person,” Angelos said. “If anyone has any questions, I’m very happy to meet new students.” 
The honors committee, in which Angelos holds a position, is comprised of five faculty members, one representative from each college. Angelos indicated, however, that committee membership will grow. “Beginning this semester,” Angelos said, “two students will be selected as representatives on the committee.”
 
Because of his desire to fulfill a service, as well as his dedication to Manchester University, Angelos simply agreed when he was asked to fill the position. “I’ve always liked the Honors Program,” he said. “I consider the position to be a natural fit for me.” Outside of class, Angelos likes to make new connections, and believes it enriches the college experience. “I really enjoy spending as much time outside of class with students I’d never meet otherwise,” he said.
 
With regard to his hopes for the future of the Honors Program, Angelos expects the program to reorganize in the coming year. “The goals are to make the descriptions of the program, such as rules and credits, as clear as possible to potential members,” he said. “If you are going to be a part of something, you want to know how it works.”
 
The program is attempting to enhance the rule-description efforts that took place last year. According to Angelos, Honors students will also be able to take part in an Honors thesis. “Students will have the opportunity to present their thesis to a panel that consists of faculty from their major,” Angelos said. Stand-alone sections of Angelos’s courses will also be available to students in the Honors Program.