In the News

Manchester offers public forum about DNA and Your Medicine


Health care professionals and members of the public are invited to a regional forum to learn about how an individual’s genetics, their DNA, influences their response to medications. This is called pharmacogenomics (pharmaco=drugs/medication; genomics=genetics/DNA)

The public forum is 4 p.m. Thursday, April 25, at the Fort Wayne, Ind., campus of Manchester University, 10627 Diebold Road. Admission is free.

Research shows that many individuals receiving a medication often do not get the desired therapeutic effect, and it is clear that adverse reactions and events are on the increase nationwide.

“This public forum will provide insight into how DNA plays a role in response to medications,” said David F. Kisor, a professor and director of pharmacogenomics education at Manchester. “It is extremely important for individuals to recognize that their inherent genetics – along with other factors, including lifestyle, age, illness, and other drugs they are taking – affects how they respond to medications.”

With an increase of people getting personalized genetic medical testing, there is currently an education gap. What does a health care professional do when a patient presents them with their genetic information? The forum at Manchester is designed to facilitate meaningful, useful discussions.

For educational purposes, three individuals at the forum will be given the opportunity to receive DNA testing related to medications.

Meghan ArwoodFollowing the forum, at 5:30 p.m., keynote speaker Meghan Arwood, Pharm.D., from the Pharmacotherapy and Translational Research program at the University of Florida will present more information on individual’s responses to medication based on genetics. She is a leader in the field of pharmacogenomics.

This forum is on National DNA Day, which is April 25 each year. It commemorates completion of the Human Genome Project in 2003 and the discovery of DNA's double helix in 1953.

The goal of National DNA Day is to offer students, teachers and members of the public an opportunity to learn about and celebrate the latest advances in genomic research and explore how those advances might affect their lives.

Students of the Personalized Medicine Coalition at Manchester University's Fort Wayne campus are excited to host the open house. It begins with an admissions presentation from 2-2:30 p.m. and tours from 2:30-3 p.m. Students in ninth grade through college; high school teachers and counselors; and university faculty and advisors are welcome to register.

The public is also welcome to stop by the Manchester University Pharmacy Programs Student Organizations Fair from 3-5 p.m. 

If you have any questions, please email pharmacy@manchester.edu
For the media:

Contact information for Dr. David F. Kisor, BS, Pharm.D., FCP
Email: dfkisor@manchester.edu
Phone: 260-470-2747
Profile: https://www.manchester.edu/academics/colleges/college-of-pharmacy-natural-health-sciences/academic-programs/pharmacy/about-pharmacy/faculty-and-staff-profiles/kisor-david

Information about Dr. Arwood: https://pharmacy.ufl.edu/faculty/meghan-j-arwood/

About Manchester University
Manchester University, with campuses in North Manchester and Fort Wayne, Ind., offers more than 60 areas of academic study to more than 1,400 students in undergraduate programs, a Master of Athletic Training, a Master of Pharmacogenomics and a four-year professional Doctor of Pharmacy. Learn more at www.manchester.edu.

Our mission
Manchester University respects the infinite worth of every individual and graduates persons of ability and conviction who draw upon their education and faith to lead principled, productive, and compassionate lives that improve the human condition.  

April 2019